Here’s some advice

Here’s a little advice for the Yahoo! News writer: Try using a dictionary.

council news

A council is an assembly of people. As a noun counsel refers to a lawyer or lawyers. And lest you think that the writer had a momentary brain hiccup, here it is again:

council news 2

I intend to follow the advice of a dictionary — not this writer’s example.

Worst news site on the Web

If you’re looking for reliable news articles on the Web, skip anything written by Yahoo! News “journalists.” The mistakes they make would be laughable if they weren’t so horrifyingly inaccurate:

am dying news

Only one person died in the United States of Ebola in 2014. The CDC reports that 11,301 people died of Ebola in Africa that year. Millions of people were not dying in the streets anywhere. Perhaps the writer suffers from Trump Syndrome, named after the presidential candidate who claimed to  have seen thousands of people cheering in New Jersey when the twin towers went down on 9/11.

This is beyond horrible, it is beyond irresponsible.

Would that be Jeb Bush’s websites?

Former governor of Florida Jeb Bush has set his sites on Vermont. Sounds good to me, except I can’t figure out what sites this Yahoo! News correspondent is referring to:

set his sites pol

Is it his websites? His campsites? His parasites? Oh, well. I may never know. Next time I’m looking for information, I’ll set my sights on a legitimate news outlet.

That’s news to Sen. Graham

Sen. Lindsey Graham would probably be surprised that his name has been changed by the editors at Yahoo! News:

lindsay graham news 2

This is the “news”

If you judge the accuracy of a news site by the quality of its writing, you might want to skip Yahoo! News. The folks there have trouble matching a subject with its verb:

cancel news

… and don’t seem to know that Angela Merkel is the German chancellor:

angel news

Now I get it

So as Yahoo! News begins the countdown to count down the hours until we change our clocks, readers are left with wondering why the writer can’t tell a phrasal verb like count down from a noun like countdown:

countdown news

Maybe the writer will read this and say, “Now I get it.”

‘Tis wrong

Why are apostrophes so difficult for some people? I don’t get it, ’cause I think they’re pretty simple to use. You know that an apostrophe can be used in contractions to signal the omission of a letter, such as isn’t (for is not) and don’t (for do not). They’re sometimes used at the beginning or end of a word to indicate a letter that’s been dropped off, if you’re followin’ me. So what letter did the writer for Yahoo! News think was omitted from tis’?

tis apos news

‘Tis clear to me that the writer doesn’t know that ’tis is a contraction of it is and that tis’ makes no sense.

Going through a phase

I’ve seen so many homophonic errors on Yahoo! that this one from Yahoo! News doesn’t faze me:

phase news trends

Was that the Sahara?

What desert has its own holiday? The Gobi? The Sahara? The Mojave? Yahoo! News doesn’t tell us, just teases with this hint of a desert:

desert news

Ms. Hoskins seems to think it’s National Pie Day, which makes no sense since pie is a dessert.

Sharpening your whistle

I’m trying to imagine how you whet your whistle, as described on Yahoo! News:

whet whistle news

The only thing I can come up with is a wooden whistle being sharpened to a point by a whittler. That would be whetting a whistle. But if the writer meant “take a drink,” then that’s “wet your whistle,” where whistle refers to your mouth.

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