Who do you trust?

Would you consider Yahoo! News a trustworthy source of information if the editors either don’t proofread or can’t spot an obvious typo in a headline?

The word they were going for is affluenza, a blend of affluence and influenza, which joined the pop culture lexicon in 2013 when it was used in the defense of an obnoxious teen charged with four counts of intoxication manslaughter.

A good time to stop

Yahoo! News makes a good case for stopping a search:

I suspect this is wrong

I’m not sure, but I think there’s an error in this headline from Yahoo! News:

Were there two London attacks, or were they suspected attacks? And what the heck was identified? I’m so confused. But so is the writer of this headline, I suspect.

Is there a letter missing?

Looks like there’s a letter missing in this headline from Yahoo! News:

I think they meant skycrapper.

Including an add’l character

The apostrophe has two uses: To show possession and to indicate the omission of letters or numerals. So, what letters or numbers did the Yahoo! News editor omit in this headline?

Actually, the editor added a letter: T. The common contraction of additional is add’l.

Is this a case of fake news?

If a major Internet news site like Yahoo! News writes a headline about someone it calls Greg Allman, is it fake news?

The editors haven’t just misspelled Gregg Allman’s name; they’ve overcapitalized or undercapitalized the name of his band. It seems they just can’t decide if it was the Allman Brothers Band of The Allman Brothers Band.

Stop meddling with the language

With competent editors, maybe Yahoo! News staffers will stop meddling with the language:

Seriously, have you ever heard of someone meddling of anything? Me neither. The correction expression is meddling in or meddling with.

I didn’t even know heath needed care

The United States Congress will be voting on the care of heath:

I had no idea that heath care was even a thing or that it needed federal funding. Thank goodness Yahoo! News is here to keep us informed!

A series of mistakes

The series of mistake in Yahoo! News leaves me dumbfounded:

series-leave-new

The word series is both singular and plural. If you’re referring to a single series, it’s singular and takes a singular verb like leaves.

Trump takes over presidency weeks early!

I thought the presidential inauguration was scheduled for January 20, 2017. But I was wrong. Somehow I missed the transition of the Cheeto Bandito from president-elect to president. Fortunately I have the geniuses at Yahoo! News to keep me up to date:

us-pres-news-hp

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