This is infuriating

This is infuriating. At least I think that’s the word the Yahoo News editor meant to use:

I don’t know if Ellen DeGeneres is infuriated, too, by the fact that the editor or writer can’t quite get her name right.

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Who do you trust?

Do you trust a site like Yahoo News after reading this on its front page?

Sloppy (or no) proofreading? Or reliance of a spell checker? Either way, a typo undermines the credibility of any news site. Careful proofreading by a literate human being is a bulwark against typos.

Regarding your word choice…

Regarding the use of the phrase in regards to on Yahoo News: It’s considered either out-and-out wrong or at best, nontraditional, by word nerds:

The correct wording is in regard to. But many editors prefer the use of regarding or concerning.

According to dictionaries…

According to dictionaries, Yahoo News editors can’t spell meteorologists:

What editors got wrong on Yahoo News

Maybe it’s just a typo to the editors at Yahoo News, but to the readers it’s a red flag:

Can you trust a source that doesn’t require proofreading on its home page and that doesn’t even use a spell-checker?

Taking the wrong route

If you’ve been rooting around Yahoo News recently, you might have noticed this headline:

Someone needs to route the editor to a dictionary, which would explain the difference between rout (which means to defeat overwhelmingly) and route (which doesn’t).

What were limited?

I’m soooo confused by Yahoo News. What were the things that “were limited”?

To me it looks like the editors were limited in their proofreading skills. And the readers? We’re limited in our comprehension, due to a missing apostrophe.

Punctuation matters.

What’s your style?

If you’re a writer, editor, blogger, or just someone interested in writing in excruciatingly correct English, you might have occasion to refer to a style guide. A style guide can be an internal company document or a public publication, like the Associated Press Stylebook. Many media companies use the AP guide as the definitive source of spelling, capitalization, word choice, and the like. But not Yahoo News, apparently.

According to AP style, cabinet should be capitalized when referring to the president’s advisers, and not to a piece of furniture. (Other authorities, such as the Government Printing Office and the New York Times, recommend capitalizing the word in that context.) But ultimately it’s a matter of house style. So, I’ll give that one a pass.

Not getting a pass? The use of him instead of the reflexive pronoun himself. (When the subject and the pronoun refer to the same person, use a reflexive pronoun, which ends with self or selves.)  And obviously, the doubled and in and and.

Fake news?

Would you be skeptical, like me, if you read this on Yahoo News?

I’m no expert, but the cost of $25K per day seemed awfully low to me. So, I read the article to find out the truth:

Looks like Yahoo News might really be Yahoo Fake News.

Not a good place for that

The home page of Yahoo News is not a good place for a typo — especially in a headline:

That Shrkeli fella is actually Martin Shkreli.

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