Can’t make a decision?

Can’t decide how to spell a word? Can’t figure out if it should be hyphenated or not? Don’t consult a dictionary. Just do what the folks at Yahoo News do: Spell it both ways!

Advertisements

Just stopped by to say “hi”

Hi! That’s the word from Yahoo News:

I’d say that Yahoo’s image as a news source takes a hit with that headline.

Warning: Profanity ahead

Warning: This headline from Yahoo News contains content unsuitable for children:

Lots of news outlets are now including the profane words of America’s current president, as if it were acceptable speech. But most of them are also using correct grammar and are able to match a verb and its subject. Some of them also follow standard guidelines and don’t capitalize the word senator unless it directly precedes a senator’s name.

Why? Fie!

Why did the editors at Yahoo News think this was OK? It’s not.

The Wi-Fi Alliance owns the trademark for Wi-Fi, which has a hyphen and two capital letters. It’s like Crock-Pot, another registered trademark that Yahoo staffers often mistreat.

Fake news!

There’s something fishy on the home page of Yahoo News:

I can’t figure out if it was the Tuscan police who released footage or the Tucson police. Judging from the fact that the incident occurred in Arizona, I’m going with the latter.

Roy Moore is not the Senate

In spite of what you may read on Yahoo News, Roy Moore is not the Republican Alabama Senate:

Obviously there’s a word missing and maybe some words out of place. Was Roy Moore the Republican Alabama Senate candidate? Or the Alabama Republican Senate candidate? Or the Republican Alabama Senate page? Or something else? I’m sooo confused.

They sat or were seated?

I don’t know what the correct wording is here at Yahoo News, I just know this is wrong:

Either were sat should be simply sat or were sat should be were seated.  The implication of each is different, so the reader is left wondering if the subjects were told where to sit. Or maybe the editor is just grammatically impaired.

That is wrong

That is just plain wrong on Yahoo News’:

If you think is should be are (because subject-verb agreement) you are right.

This is infuriating

This is infuriating. At least I think that’s the word the Yahoo News editor meant to use:

I don’t know if Ellen DeGeneres is infuriated, too, by the fact that the editor or writer can’t quite get her name right.

Who do you trust?

Do you trust a site like Yahoo News after reading this on its front page?

Sloppy (or no) proofreading? Or reliance of a spell checker? Either way, a typo undermines the credibility of any news site. Careful proofreading by a literate human being is a bulwark against typos.

%d bloggers like this: