Readers vow to stand up to errors

In other news, according to Yahoo News, European leaders vow to “stand-up” to Trump:

With a hyphen, stand-up is a variant of standup, which is an adjective (he’s a standup guy) or noun (he’s a comedian who only does standup). As a verb, it’s stand up, without a hyphen and the idiom that means “to confront” is stand up to, also without a hyphen.

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New York AG proponent of sexual misconduct?

I’m scratching myself and wiping the dandruff off my keyboard over this teaser on Yahoo News:

I know what an opponent of sexual misconduct is. But what is an opponent against sexual misconduct? I think it means the attorney general of New York is a proponent of the shady activity. He’s also accused of non-consenual behavior, which is another head-scratcher. Maybe if Yahoo’s editors used a spell-checker they would tell us that it’s consensual behavior.

If only there were a way…

If only there were a way to check the spelling of app names. Like, if the folks at Yahoo News had a picture of the app Grindr so that they could see how it’s spelled. Wouldn’t that be great!?

To to funny

If it’s really cold where you live, the weather might be called wintry. Except on yahoo.com, where it’s wintery:

In the U.S., the preferred pronunciation is with two syllables and the preferred spelling is wintry. Choosing an uncommon spelling of a word is not as bad as two to‘s, which I find too, too funny.

Apostrophe-impaired?

Is there a shortage of apostrophes at Yahoo Lifestyle? Or is it just a shortage of editors who know how to use them? Here’s a headline and teaser that has me questioning if Yahoo hires only apostrophe- and spelling-impaired editors:

OK. So that was just a careless mistake (or two or three). The actual article must be better, right? Wrong. Those folks at Yahoo are still apostrophe-impaired, unable to put them in two places in one sentence:

Let’s take the charitable view that this is just a typo and not the result of a writer’s unfamiliarity with a common expression like “fill it up”:

I’d overlook this mistake (just like the writer overlooked the word to before walk), if it were the only goof, but alas, it’s not:

Another apostrophe goes missing here, but maybe it’s just the result of a malfunctioning keyboard:

But, wait! There’s more! After I wrote this post, the headline and teaser were corrected. Somewhat:

It looks like the editors noticed the missing apostrophe and the typo. Good job! Maybe next time they’ll learn to use a spell-checker and proofread before publishing. If not, I may just harass them some more.

This speaks volumes

This headline on Yahoo Sports speaks volumes about the proofreading skills of its editors:

To paraphrase the occupant of the Oval Office, they consult themselves because they have “a very good brain.” Except it should be Brian.

Break up that breakup

Did the editors at Yahoo Lifestyle break up with their dictionary? Is that why they used the noun breakup instead of the phrasal verb break up?

Think about it: If breakup were a verb, what would its past tense be? Breakupped?

How is your state of nind?

If you think readers don’t care about typos, think again. Here’s a little typo (in a headline, no less!) from yahoo.com:

Did readers notice? Of course they did. And they had something to say about the error:

  • His nind is fine. His mind, not so much.
  • What exactly is “Nind”? perhaps its the author that is not doing well….
  • However, Wilbur’s ”Nind” is in question now.
  • Trump is in a constant New York state of nind.
  • State of nind?
  • Trump’s “state of nind”? yahoo has surely lost its own.
  • A nind is a terrible thing to waste.
  • why not do a spell check yahoo
  • I can see typo or spelling/grammatical errors getting thru the proofing process when it’s part of the article’s text. That’s impossible to always avoid. The headlines should never have one though. That’s embarrassing.
And my personal favorite:
  • I do worry about the “State of Nind” of the proofreaders at yahoo. Perhaps they should have their Covfefes examined.

 

Is this a Brendan Fraser conspiracy?

When I read this on yahoo.com, I thought the missing word may have been a careless error:

But now I’m not so sure. There may be a conspiracy over at the Internet giant to ruin the actor’s career. Why else would the editors run another story about the star of “The Mummy”?

The actor who may have been blacklisted and who may have been sexually assaulted is Brendan Fraser.

Should you share with colleagues?

Nothing makes a newsroom look more dysfunctional than the inability to spell a simple word the same way twice. Case in point: This headline from the home page of Yahoo Finance:

Was this just a simple typo? In an effort to sleuth out the truth, I looked at the article itself. The headline and text in the video are equally confused:

Maybe Yahoo writers should start sharing the same dictionary. Or maybe they should just refer to people you work with as colleagues.

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