Kim Kardashian and deadly fame

If you’re unfamiliar with French, as this Yahoo! Style writer appears to be, perhaps you should avoid certain words and phrases, like femme fatale:

fame-fatale-sty

Pardon my French

It looks as if this Yahoo! Style writer knows a little French and not much more English. If this were an actual English word, it would probably be pronounced cash-ay. If it were a real English word, it would be spelled cachet.

cache-acc-sty

How to lose all credibility

If you’re a writer and your beat is fashion, shouldn’t you know how to spell the name of luxury brand Bottega Veneta? Not if you work for Yahoo! Style:

bottega-venetta-sty-hp

If you think that’s a typo, you would be wrong. In the article, after misspelling model Raquel Zimmermann’s name, she mangles Bottega Veneta:

bottega-venetta-sty

So, how much credibility does the writer — and Yahoo! Style —  have?

Can you spot it?

Can you spot the misspelling from yahoo.com?

fp-dalmation

The white dog with the spots is a Dalmatian. The breed is named after Dalmatia, an area on the Adriatic Sea.

No clue. No clue at all

I have no idea how this misspelling made it to the front page of Yahoo! Style:

paire-sty-hp

Is that some new, hip word that buzzing on social media? Is that the product of an American public school education? Anyone have a clue as to how that got by the editor, proofreader, and spell-checker?

You just gotta work through it!

If you’re trying to read this article from Yahoo! Style and you’re stumbling on some serious misspellings, you just gotta work through it:

paling-around

Was Ms. Willis paling around, bleaching her skin? Or was she palling around with friends? You decide. Did you notice that the writer didn’t leave intact intact? Yeah, me, too. And I’m pretty sure Ms. Willis didn’t say she “gotta work though it,” aren’t you?

Mystery unsolved!

Here’s a mystery from Yahoo! Style: How does a mistake like this go undetected by writers, editors, proofreaders, building maintenance staff, and everyone else working at Yahoo!?

mystert-sty-hp

Maybe this wasn’t written in this country

While reading this photo caption on Yahoo! Style, I was struck by the writer’s use of the British whilst:

whilst-sty

Perhaps Yahoo! outsourced the writing to an almost-English-speaking country. Maybe this was written for a UK site, and not for the American market. Maybe that’s why the writer capitalized queen; in some countries that are not the United States, that might actually be correct. And maybe that Lady Fag she writes of isn’t related to Ladyfag, the writer from New York City. The typo of that for than might be okie-dokie in the land where she lives. But in no English-speaking country is is what makes an acceptable substitute for the correct are what make.

All writing serves a purpose

All writing serves a purpose. And the purpose of this article from Yahoo! Style may be to illustrate what not to do. First lesson: If you’re including names in your article, spell them correctly. It’s not enough to just misspell them in the same way. If you’re writing about Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Google her name.

huntingdon-1

Second, if you’re writing about editors-in-chief, don’t capitalize the title and don’t look like an idiot by forming the plural incorrectly. And make sure you’re confident enough in your English to include the article the in “in the second row” and “in the third row.”

Don’t follow the example of this gal. She’s nothing if not consistent. When she misspells a name like Stella Tennant, she sticks with it. None of this silly Googling a name to check the spelling:

huntingdon-2

Finally we encounter this gem, a sterling example of what not to do:

huntingdon-3

The takeaway: Read everything you write before you publish it. Read everything you write before you publish it.

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent

Well, you gotta give this Yahoo! Style writer props for being consistent. Not only did she misspell both the first and last names of actor Jussie Smollett, but she also did it twice:

jessie-smollet-sty

It takes a special kind of confidence to pound out a name without bothering to Google it first.

%d bloggers like this: