Where do you get your information?

When you’re looking for reliable information about investing, finance, or business, what website do you turn to? Yahoo! Finance? If you’re like most people, you’re adversely influenced by the number of mistakes, no matter how minor, you find. Typos, misspellings, and grammar mistakes all erode the credibility of a website or an article.

So, how credible do you find this article, where the writer apparently knew she needed an apostrophe in the first sentence, but couldn’t figure out where? Or that she’s a little skimpy when it comes to her hyphen usage?

bingbing fin 0

(Omitting the hyphens in an age is one of the top 3 hyphen errors you’ll find on Yahoo!.)

I really think that if you’re going to write about finance and business for adults, you need to know the difference between a product (oh, like, say a Barbie doll) and a manufacturer (like Mantel). I’m pretty sure that even though Barbie is a pretty smart, yet plastic cookie, she did not release a doll:

barbie released doll fin

Perhaps to prove that she is completely uninterested in the correct use of punctuation, the writer throws in some random and thoroughly incorrect commas. But I’ll admit to one positive note: The writer has got me interested in seeing those ads where the Chinese actress stares, presumably at the camera:

stared commas fin

Best Misspelling of the Day

It’s a privilege to introduce Best Misspelling of the Day, brought to us by Yahoo! Celebrity

priviledges cel

What did you expect?

I shouldn’t be surprised at the number of mistakes made in a simple photo caption on Yahoo! Travel. None of them is horrifying, but taken together, they give off an amateurish vibe. I might have ignored the totally random hyphen, the misspelled restaurants (don’t these people have a spell-checker?), the missing S in miles, but I can’t ignore the overall effect:

afterall tra

But mistakes are to be expected; after all, this is Yahoo!.

‘Downton Abbey’: Not as popular as you think

You may have thought that the wildly popular British drama “Downton Abbey” was known throughout the English-speaking world. But there’s at least one English speaker who’s unfamiliar with the show. Unfortunately, that person writes for yahoo.com:

fp downtown abbey

Oh no, you didn’t!

Oh, no! The “news editor” for Yahoo! Style didn’t just do this, did she?

david orussell sty

Yup. That’s how a “news editor” spells David O. Russell’s name.

Whoa: Somebody can’t spell

Whoa! There’s a serious (but very common) misspelling on the home page of Yahoo! Food:

woah food

Can there be two GOP front-runners?

Only on the Yahoo! front page can you find two front-runners. There’s this one with a hyphen:

frp front-runner

and this one without a hyphen:

fp frontrunner

Either one is correct (although the American Heritage Dictionary prefers front-runner). What’s not correct is using both spellings.

That gives me a headache

Reading misspellings and typos like this one on the Yahoo! front page give me a headache. Or should I say heaache:

fp headresses

I wouldn’t want a byline

I think the writer for Yahoo! Makers didn’t want a byline for this article because he or she knew it wasn’t a model of journalistic excellence:

epsom salt diy

It’s just a tad sloppy, isn’t it? There’s the use of you instead of your. The missing hyphen in what should be old-fashioned. The lowercase and missing S in Epsom salts. And a torn-apart cheesecloth. Heck, if I made that many mistakes in two sentences, I wouldn’t want my name associated with it either.

Once is a typo

Once is a typo. Twice is a misspelling. That’s what we’ve got on yahoo.com, where an I goes missing in two misspellings of healthier:

fp healther

Ooh! Ooh! I think I found one of the missing I’s:

fp iis

I wonder where the other one iis.

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