Is this a case of fake news?

If a major Internet news site like Yahoo! News writes a headline about someone it calls Greg Allman, is it fake news?

The editors haven’t just misspelled Gregg Allman’s name; they’ve overcapitalized or undercapitalized the name of his band. It seems they just can’t decide if it was the Allman Brothers Band of The Allman Brothers Band.

This is not what it appeares to be

This appears to be a teaser from website written by an amateur author tapping at a keyboard in his mother’s basement:

It is actually from yahoo.com, which allegedly employs professional writers and editors. (But apparently no proofreaders.)

How many does it take?

How many errors does it take for a website to lose credibility. If you see three errors in a photo caption, like this one from Yahoo! Style, do you trust anything about the site?

The author is writing about Hillary Kerr, but can’t manage to spell her name right, nor the name of the websites Byrdie and Obsessee.

I’d give that caption an A+ for alternative facts and an F for accuracy. But wait! There’s more! The caption was reformatted and “corrected.” Except that two of three errors are still there:

Were you blinded by the sunn when you wrote that?

It’s hard to believe that Yahoo! Style editors don’t proofread headlines before they’re published. Maybe the editor was blinded by the sun and didn’t have sunglasses when reading this:

Whoa is me!

Whoa! Where did the editors at Yahoo! Celebrity get the idea that this is correct?!

It’s not the accent per se . . .

It’s not the spelling per se that’s horrible on Yahoo! Style:

It’s the accent over the E. Why the writer thought that was necessary is beyond me. Maybe if the writer had spent less time on creating a French-inspired per se and more time proofreading, she would have noticed the typo.

Keep that word intact

Whenever I see intact spelled as two words I wonder what was going through the writer’s head. Like here on Yahoo! Beauty:

Did the writer think that the hairstyle was d being tactful?

I’m just cury-ous

I’m cury-ous: How does a mistake like this on Yahoo! Style get past the editor and the spell-checker?

Illiterate in two languages

When the editors at Yahoo! Style aren’t mangling the English language, they’re destroying French, or now-English phrases derived from French. Like this:

I can only assume the editors meant prêt-à-porter, which means “ready-to-wear,” and is a widely understood term in fashion. Except at Yahoo!.

Big Bird, Cookie Monster, and manmade errors

Maybe the writer for Yahoo! Style is dealing with a funky keyboard with an occasionally inoperable Shift key and a space bar that’s kinda jacked:

Just in case the writer actually made these mistakes intentionally, let’s school her: Big Bird and Cookie Monster are Muppets deserving of being treated as proper nouns. And manmade is one word according to the American Heritage Dictionary, though it allows the hyphenated man-made.

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