Carefully editing planning was necessary

Here’s what the folks at Yahoo! Style could use: Some carefully planned editing. Or at least careful proofreading so that an adjective, and not an adverb, is used to modify a noun:

carefully sty

Nice try, but wrong

I gotta give the Yahoo! Celebrity writer credit for trying to use hyphens in a compound modifier. But not too much credit, because he got it wrong:

five-to-eight cel

He tried to combine “five-second to eight-second technical issue,” which is admirable. But the result isn’t quite right. The correct use of hyphens is: five- to eight-second technical issue.

Dis-graceful

If this were written by a third-grader, the mistakes might be understandable. But coming from a professional writer for Yahoo! Style, they’re downright disgraceful:

graceful sty

Someone writing about fashion should know that paillettes needs two L’s; they are a type of sequin. And when the plural word is the subject of the sentence, it requires a plural subject. And Lord help her (because no one at Yahoo! will), the writer actually thinks that graceful is a suitable modifier for the verb floats. It is not; the adverb gracefully is.

Make your own candle holder holder

Even if the writer for Yahoo! Makers managed to spell Smoky Mountain correctly, this brief excerpt would be problematic:

candlestick holders diy

Why did she use the adverb cheaply? It apparently modifies available, but have you ever heard of anything that was “cheaply available,” and not merely cheap?

But the worst mistake is the terminology she used to describe this DIY project. She calls the objects “candlestick holders,” but candlesticks are candle holders. So, you’d be making holders for candle holders. She’s obviously confused a candle with a candlestick.

What were the outfits wearing?

I have a question for the writer for Yahoo! Celebrity: What does a scantily clad outfit wear?

scantily-clad outfits cel

And I have another question: Why is there a hyphen between the adverb scantily and the word it modifies (clad)? And one more question: Was Ms. Jenner scantily clad or were her outfits?

Did it immediately kick in?

Did your inner Grammar Cop immediately kick in when you read this from the Yahoo! front page?

fp immediate

What’s on the chopping block?

If I made as many mistakes in my job as this writer for Yahoo! Style, I’d be afraid my job would be on the chopping block:

chopping block sty

At least I know the difference between a chopping block and an auction block, which is what she meant, but didn’t write. I also know not to put a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word following it.

What a waist!

Fashion shows are becoming more and more inclusive as women with less-than-perfect bodies take to the runways. As noted by a Yahoo! Style writer, one model’s body is unique: Her waist is just a tad higher than most women’s. In fact, it’s just under her armpits:

pink rope pic pink rope

I think it’s great! Not so great? The writer’s inability to match a verb (which should be suggest) with its plural subject and neglecting to hyphenate the adjective modern-day. But at least she spelled waist correctly, even if she can’t identify it.

Hand her a bevvy

What was the Yahoo! Style writer drinking when she wrote this? A bevvy? (That’s a drink. An alcoholic one.)

bevvy sty

There’s practically a bevy of minor mistakes there. Nothing serious, but enough to detract from the writing. Besides the misspelling, there’s the incorrect hyphen after an adverb ending in -LY and the use of a instead of an.

Don’t dangle that in public

Reading this on Yahoo! Style, I noticed a dangling participle:

coming of age

Unless the writer meant that Abercrombie & Fitch came of age in suburban New England in the early- to mid-aughts, there’s a problem with that sentence. That’s because the participial phrase, which begins with the participle coming, modifies the word that follows it. What the writer should have said:

Coming of age in suburban New England in the early- to mid-aughts, I thought Abercrombie & Fitch…

Oh, the writer also screwed up the hyphens, but you knew that.

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