Of all the grammar mistakes made by Yahoo! writers and editors, this is probably one of the worst because it’s in the first word of the first sentence of the first paragraph. And it’s soooo obviously wrong:

me and my par

I don’t know anyone, much less a professional writer, who would say that, much less write that. The Yahoo! Parenting writer needs to go back to second grade or start hanging out with people who speak correct English.

You, me, and the rest of the English-speaking world know that the correct pronoun is I, not me. And if it sounds awkward as the first word that’s because it shouldn’t be the first word. The pronoun I should come second in the compound subject: My 7-year-old son Jack and I.

And then I fell asleep

It must be so exhausting to write for Yahoo! Makers that the writer fell asleep before completing this photo caption:

plate setting diy

Clearly the writer wasn’t tired from searching the dictionary for the correct words to use. If she had tried looking up plate setting she would have found it doesn’t exist in the American Heritage Dictionary. The combination of plate and utensils for one person is called a place setting. Let’s hope that next time she’s a little less drained and she takes care to match a verb to a singular subject (like jar).

No wonder they’re laughing

Did the Cleveland Indians’ players read this on the Yahoo! front page? Is that why they’re laughing?

fp indianss

In the United States, team names are treated as plurals, so it makes no sense to form the plural of a team name by adding an apostrophe and an S. If the name ends in an S, we just add an apostrophe. That’s what we do in the U.S., but the style may be different in the country where this was written.

Based on your word choice…

Based on her word choice, I’d say the writer for Yahoo! Style is grammatically challenged:

based off of sty

The first clue was the use of the singular pronoun it to refer to a plural antecedent (images). The correct pronoun is they. The second clue was the expression based off of, which is just wrong. The correct expression is based on.

Why not me?

Does this sound right to you? It obviously sounds right to the Yahoo! Makers writer:

for i diy

But it’s wrong. No, not the “for Meredith and” part; just the use of the pronoun I. The correct pronoun is me, the objective case of the pronoun I and the object of the preposition for.

Not that kind of writer

Some writers never make grammatical mistakes. They know every tense of every irregular verb; they can identify the subject of a sentence in a sea of prepositional phrases; they never use a plural pronoun with a singular antecedent. Some writers never make grammatical mistakes. This writer is not one of them:

shes began sty

She’s begun making her first string of mistakes in this article for Yahoo! Style with a grammatical gaffe that’s so easy to spot it’s a wonder it slipped by the editor. Oh, yeah, I almost forgot: Yahoo! doesn’t employ editors who are actually concerned with grammar.

Grammatical errors cause uproar

If only. Can you imagine what would happen if readers of the Yahoo! front page created an uproar over every grammatical error? Maybe then the management would take the quality of its writing seriously. And maybe we wouldn’t see such an obvious grammar gaffe as a mismatched subject and verb:

fp plans causes

Did you just dash that off?

Did the writer of this teaser on Yahoo! Celebrity just dash it off? I’d say so:

dash cel

The first hint was the mention of Dash boutiques since there’s only one Dash boutique in Hollywood. Obviously the writer didn’t have time to verify that little fact. Then it was the undercapitalized Pilates, which is a proper noun. But who has time to check a dictionary? Finally it was the mismatched subject (signs) and verb (which should be prohibit). OK, that’s not the result of dashing off a sentence; that’s the result of being poorly educated.

A series of mistakes

A series of mistakes has been made on the Yahoo! home page. Here’s just one:

fp series have

The word series is both singular and plural. It’s plural if you’re referring to more than one series, and takes a plural verb. But in this case, it’s singular (you can tell because the writer refers to a series).

Are is wrong; is is right

When a compound subject is joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb always agrees with noun closer to it. Except on the Yahoo! Style, where the rules of grammar are often violated:

neither are sty

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