This speaks volumes

This headline on Yahoo Sports speaks volumes about the proofreading skills of its editors:

To paraphrase the occupant of the Oval Office, they consult themselves because they have “a very good brain.” Except it should be Brian.


How is your state of nind?

If you think readers don’t care about typos, think again. Here’s a little typo (in a headline, no less!) from

Did readers notice? Of course they did. And they had something to say about the error:

  • His nind is fine. His mind, not so much.
  • What exactly is “Nind”? perhaps its the author that is not doing well….
  • However, Wilbur’s ”Nind” is in question now.
  • Trump is in a constant New York state of nind.
  • State of nind?
  • Trump’s “state of nind”? yahoo has surely lost its own.
  • A nind is a terrible thing to waste.
  • why not do a spell check yahoo
  • I can see typo or spelling/grammatical errors getting thru the proofing process when it’s part of the article’s text. That’s impossible to always avoid. The headlines should never have one though. That’s embarrassing.
And my personal favorite:
  • I do worry about the “State of Nind” of the proofreaders at yahoo. Perhaps they should have their Covfefes examined.


Seems like a terrible idea

According to Yahoo News, the current occupant of the Oval Office has suggested arming high teachers:

I think it’s a terrible idea. Why would you want to arm anyone who’s high?

A lost win

I know virtually nothing about American football, but I do know that this tidbit on is wrong:

Philadelphia isn’t looking for its first Super Bowl. It’s looking for its first Super Bowl win. That’s kinda different.

Just stopped by to say “hi”

Hi! That’s the word from Yahoo News:

I’d say that Yahoo’s image as a news source takes a hit with that headline.

Forth what it’s Worth . . .

This is probably a common typo involving the Texas city of Fort Worth. But the fact that it appears on one of the most visited pages on the Internet — — makes it a real embarrassment:

Real entertainment

The real entertainment in Yahoo Entertainment comes from the typos on its home page:

For those outside the United States (and possibly for some people in the United States), we do not hold elections retroactively. Presidential elections are held every four years, and only in years whose last two digits are divisible by four. So, the next election for president is 2020.  Seems like Trevor Noah knows more about our elections than the folks at Yahoo.

Pleading or pledging

Readers could be pleading with the editors at Yahoo Lifestyle to employ a proofreader, or at least a spell-checker:

That doesn’t jibe with the correct word

The writer for Yahoo Entertainment must have had jazz or swing music on her mind when she wrote this:

But that just doesn’t jibe with the correct usage of the word. Though lots of people confuse jive and jibe, most authorities say that only one means “agree, be in accord,” and that word is jibe.

A hairy problem

Why on God’s green earth did the Yahoo Lifestyle writer think this is correct?

I think she was going for hairdo, and became a tad confused. The contraction ‘do is often used on Yahoo in place of hairdo. The apostrophe is supposed to indicate that there are letters missing, so the writer was really describing a hair hairdo. But according to the American Heritage dictionary, do (sans apostrophe) is correct and hairdo is one word.


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