What rich people look like

Displaying a remarkable ability to tell a person’s financial worth by a mere picture, the writer for Yahoo! Style declares the cast of a Las Vegas show “well-heeled”:

Here’s the picture that led to that bit of wisdom:

Can you tell that they’re wealthy? Or would you use a different word to describe them? Maybe one that you actually know the meaning of and that actually applies to the picture. Then maybe you can tell the writer that well-heeled means prosperous or wealthy.

Blades schmades

You might call them shoulders, but to this Yahoo! Style writer, they’re shoulder blades:

Here’s that suit with its “aggressive shoulder blades”:

Those are some shoulder pads! One might even call them “aggressive.” Perhaps that’s what this writer, with her ignorance on basic human anatomy, meant.

No access to Google?

Apparently Yahoo! Style writers have no access to the Internet and search engines, so they’re reliant on their memories when they write. Unfortunately, some have a rather faulty memory:

The former Kate Middleton is really Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.

Left to her own devices

Without benefit of a competent editor, the Yahoo! Style writer was left to her own devices. So she came up with a statement that’s just not right:

After reading this

After reading this, I realized that the Yahoo! Style writer doesn’t know what a dangling participle is:

According to that sentence, paramedics revived the child — which would be a little challenging since they allegedly performed that miracle after arriving at her location.

The dangling participial phrase “after reviving the child” requires a subject, which the reader expects to find immediately after the phrase. Thus, the writer (and her accomplice, the editor) told us it was paramedics. The correct wording would be something like: After the officer revived the child.

Ford does it twice!

If you read this headline on Yahoo! Finance, would you be as confused as I am?

That headline from the homepage of Finance is for an article about Ford and General Motors. How much confidence would you have in the accuracy of the article?

A mistake that will live in infamy

When Franklin Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy,” he wasn’t saying it would be famous. He was telling the world that it was a day that would be remembered for an evil act. When the Yahoo! Style used the word infamy to describe the effect of the Duchess of Cambridge on designers, she was saying she has no idea what infamy means:

Infamy is not a synonym for fame, just as infamous is not a synonym for famous. Infamy and infamous imply notoriety for evil, disgraceful, or criminal actions.

Stop meddling with the language

With competent editors, maybe Yahoo! News staffers will stop meddling with the language:

Seriously, have you ever heard of someone meddling of anything? Me neither. The correction expression is meddling in or meddling with.

I didn’t even know heath needed care

The United States Congress will be voting on the care of heath:

I had no idea that heath care was even a thing or that it needed federal funding. Thank goodness Yahoo! News is here to keep us informed!

Removing your mistakes has never been exciting

Yahoo! Style staff seems to include a writer who is still learning English. That’s OK. There’s nothing wrong with hiring ESL students, especially if they’re working for a trade school, where on-the-job training is part of the experience. If they’re employed by a for-profit company, then they need a competent editor to avoid publishing an embarrassing statement like this:

Try to ignore the obvious grammatical gaffe and focus on the allegation that removing layers [of clothing] has never been exciting. You won’t get an argument from me.

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