Great laugh

I had a great laugh when I read this on Yahoo! Style:

great-lawn-sty

The poor gal who wrote that was trying to be clever, but she only showed her ignorance. There is no Great Lawn at the White House. There is a North Lawn and a South Lawn, but no Great Lawn.

Take a peek at this!

Take a peek at this excerpt from Yahoo! Sports:

peak your interest mlb

If that doesn’t pique your interest in learning about homophones, nothing will.

Shortest pants ever?

If you’re a writer for Yahoo! Style, a site that’s about women and fashion (and some other things that defy categorization), shouldn’t you know something about, well, fashion? Apparently not. Here we see a photo caption that describes what must be the shortest pants ever worn by an adult:

inseam sty

Anyone who has ever worn, bought, or seen pants knows that the inseam is the length of the pants from the crotch to the hem; it is the length of the seam on the inside of the leg. Makes sense. So, what was the genius writer describing in this photo?

inseam pic

I’m guessin’ she was referring to the rise, the distance from the top of the waistband to the crotch. Or maybe she was describing a whole different outfit which we are not privileged to see.

When did that happen?

When did 14-year-olds become preteens? Oh, when they were born and stayed preteens up until the day before their 13th birthday — at least according to everyone who isn’t a writer for Yahoo! Style:

preteen sty

I know that Yahoo! writers and editors are not good with numbers. They confuse millions and billions, think that digits and letters are the same thing,  and just don’t get percentages. But you’d think they’d know that fourteen isn’t a preteen because teen is part of the word.

Writer under fire

Sometimes it’s not the Yahoo! Finance writers that are under fire — but sometimes it is. Take this example of nonsense, which seems to indicate that the writer thinks “under fire” is somehow different from being a target:

under fire

I’d be pissed, too!

I’d be pissed, too if a video of my husband (drunk or not) removing my garter belt went viral. So after reading this on Yahoo! Style, who could blame the bride for suing the videographer?

garter belt wend

Most brides wear a garter on their wedding day. It’s worn on the thigh and looks kind of like this:

garter blue

A garter belt is an actual belt, worn around (or just below) the waist, like this:

garter belt pic 2

I don’t know why the groom was going after that particular garment, exposing more of his bride than modesty permits. Oh, wait! I do know why! He wasn’t trying to remove a garter belt, just a garter. Once again I’ve been duped by a dope who knows nothing of women’s undergarments.

Hocked? I’m shocked!

I’m shocked, but probably shouldn’t be. This Yahoo! Style writer (and her editor, if she has one) thinks that hocked means sold:

hocked sty

It does not. The verb hock means to pawn, as in, “she hocked her dictionary at the local pawn shop because she felt she didn’t need it.” The verb the writer should have used is hawked.

U.S. 8-year medal drought finally over

Forget what you think you know about Michael Phelps, the Final Five U.S. gymnasts, and Simone Manuel. It’s all a hoax. The United States of America hasn’t won a medal in the Olympics since 2008. At least until this boxer came along:

fp first medal

The long drought of losses and disappointment at the Olympics is finally over. At least according to Yahoo!.

Ha-ha. I kid. The truth is, Mr. Hernandez won the first medal in boxing for the U.S. since 2008. It’s just a teensy, weensy, itsy, bitsy detail that some editor forgot to mention.

Did they take back her diploma?

How do you become a former graduate of a school? If you’re a graduate of Parsons School of Design, aren’t you always a graduate? Or can the school rescind your diploma and make you a former graduate? Only the writer for Yahoo! Style knows:

former grad sty

Knowledge of English optional

Day after day I encounter the most unusual word choices on Yahoo!. In just the last few days, I’ve noticed that Yahoo! scribes don’t know the difference between a debriefing and a debunking, a degree and a diploma, and a regimen and a regiment. Now, a vocabulary-challenged writer for Yahoo! Style adds more examples. It seems that she thinks one ascribes to a style, rather than subscribing to one:

ascribe to sty

And she clearly overlooked the fact that buzzword contains the word word for reason: A buzzword is a word or phrase — not a trend:

buzzword sty

I suppose that for those writers with a limited or faulty vocabulary, a job at Yahoo! is a godsend. So, there’s that.

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