This seams wrong

If you believed what you read on Yahoo! Style (and why would you, really?) you’d expect pins along the hemline of this gal’s pants:

hemline-sty

But if you looked at the accompanying photo, you’d realize that the writer doesn’t know the difference between a hem and a seam:

hemline-pic

This is a shoo-in for worst mistake of the day

From Yahoo! Style:

shoe-in-style

The noun meaning a sure winner is shoo-in.

Kelsea Ballerini may be a year late

While the rest of us have been ringing in 2017, singer Kelsea Ballerini  has been a year behind us, according to Yahoo! Style:

ringing-in-2016-sty

Where did the time go?

Doesn’t it seem that it was just yesterday that we were facing Dec. 23, 2016? But time flies, doesn’t it? At least it does at Yahoo! Finance, where it was 2017:

2017-fin

The bigger the package…

Well. This is generally a G-rated blog, but sometimes Yahoo! staffers make R-rated mistakes. This time the Yahoo! Style makes this claim:

prics-sty

Could be. The bigger the package, the bigger the pric. Not that I’m speaking from experience., but I hear many people saying that.

When words out are of order

If you’re shopping around for a great loan, you might be interested in this article from Yahoo! Finance:

save-when-money-fin-per-hp

Unfortunately (but not surprisingly), you’d be disappointed. The article isn’t about saving “when money shopping.” It’s about saving money when shopping. That’s just a little different.

Words with friends

Someone should have a word with this Yahoo! Style writer and suggest that perhaps she up her writing game. A real friend might suggest that she learn how to proofread, so that she doesn’t spell Scrabble like this:

face-lip

And then maybe someone could explain the importance of getting real facts. Scrabble isn’t the original “friends with words.”  It’s considered the original Words with Friends, which is an actual word game. The game didn’t get a face lip (which is where most lips are), it got a facelift. As for the rest of the sentence, a true friend wouldn’t bother to read it since it appears to be a bunch of random words.

What does it do?

If you’re looking for a decadent candle to give this holiday season, take a look at this recommendation from Yahoo! Style:

it-does-sty

It’s not the greatest description of the candle. The writer managed to get the name of the product wrong (it’s Campagne d’Italie, not d’italia). And she mentions something that it does, but I don’t know what that is. As for the holder, the writer is correct when she says it’s “marble-esque” (though I’d prefer an actual word like “marble-like”) if she means actual marble. Yes, indeedie, it comes in a marble holder.

Other mistakes pale in comparison

I love sharing my classy spirits and bubbly, so I was interested in this description of a gift on Yahoo! Style:

pale-sty-1

I assumed the writer meant bubbly (which is slang for champagne) and not bubbles, but with Yahoo! writers, you never know… Anyhoo, here’s that “Champagne pale”:

pale-pail-pic

Now the American Heritage Dictionary says that when you’re writing about that sparkling white wine, it’s champagne, but the region it comes from is Champagne. Maybe the writer uses a different authority for spelling and capitalization. That could happen.

The item in question sure does look pale; in fact its color is very, very light. You might even call it a “pale pail” — that is, if you knew the difference between pale and a pail.

That’s always been my dream

I’ve had a lifelong dream of having a long life. You might say it’s my lifelong long-life dream. But the staff at Yahoo! Style thinks my long-life dream isn’t about a long life, but about being George Clooney:

long-life-sty

They would be wrong. And so would long-life.

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