A good time to stop

Yahoo! News makes a good case for stopping a search:

This doesn’t pass the smell test

If only there were a way for the Yahoo! Style writer to verify the spelling of the captions she writes. Maybe if she had a picture of the eau de parfum she’s writing about, she wouldn’t make these misspellings:

Oh, wait! Here’s the actual picture that goes with that caption:

Maybe she didn’t think she needed to look at it. But when writing this caption:

. . . don’t you think she should have checked out the picture of the bottle of eau de parfum, which is quite different from cologne and eau de cologne:

Well, she finally got the product right in this caption:

. . .  but not the name of the manufacturer:

If these captions didn’t appear right next to the product pictures, perhaps no one would have noticed that the writer can’t copy words right under her nose. But they’re there and there’s no amount of eau de parfum that can cover the stink.

The ghost of Audrey Hepburn

Many people say Audrey Hepburn was an angelic actress of heavenly beauty. They may be correct — literally. According to Yahoo! Celebrity after her death, Audrey Hepburn worked for UNICEF:

Where do you keep your clothes?

While most people keep their clothes in a closet and maybe a dresser, this Yahoo! Style has wardrobe stables:

I think that means she hangs her dresses in a horse stall. Or it could just be proof that a dictionary should be a staple for every writer.

Great proofreading job!

What are the odds that someone at yahoo.com proofread this headline? Zero.

At least it wasn’t tinnitus

Whew! Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ear, can be difficult to deal with. According to Yahoo! Movies, the  character Baby only suffered from ringing in his eardrums. That’s not so bad:

I’m not mathematical genius

I’m no mathematical genius, in fact, I’m barely competent in basic arithmetic. But I’m pretty sure that this claim on Yahoo! Style is off by at least 100 years:

Levi’s the company has been around since 1853, which is somewhat more than 50 years ago. I think. But I’m no mathematical genius, so I could be wrong.

Tousling the language

Proving once again that knowledge of English isn’t a requirement for a job writing for yahoo.com, the Internet giant unleashes this assault on readers:

Mr. Fallon didn’t tussle anyone’s hair; that would involve a vigorous struggle or scuffle. What he did was tousle the then-candidate’s hair. He messed it up, similar to what Yahoo!’s editors are doing with the language.

Find a lucrative career

Here’s some unsolicited advice to the editors of yahoo.com: Find a lucrative career that doesn’t depend on knowledge of English:

The adjective lucrative doesn’t mean substantial or significant. It means profitable.

Are plastic tires next?

When I read this headline on Yahoo! Style, I pictured Ms. Johnson wearing shoes we commonly refer to as “jellies” or maybe the much-reviled Crocs;

But, noooo. They were shoes made by Gucci. And according to the article, they are plastic. Except where “they are made entirely of rubber”:

Maybe next we’ll be reading about truck tires made of plastic.

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