Knowledge of geography optional

You don’t need to be an expert in geography to write for Yahoo! Style. If you don’t know an English town from an English county, don’t worry — you could still making the writing team. The author of this gem did:

Berkshire is not a town outside of London; it is a county. St. Mark’s church, the site of Ms. Middleton’s wedding, is in Englefield, Berkshire. Englefield is the town outside of London.

I’m not mathematical genius

I’m no mathematical genius, in fact, I’m barely competent in basic arithmetic. But I’m pretty sure that this claim on Yahoo! Style is off by at least 100 years:

Levi’s the company has been around since 1853, which is somewhat more than 50 years ago. I think. But I’m no mathematical genius, so I could be wrong.

Are you being series?

Is the writer for Yahoo! Style being serious? Did she really think this paragraph was ready for the big time?

Didn’t she notice that the title of the book is “Debutante Divorcée”? How are we supposed to interpret “big hair sprayed hair”? I’ll guess it’s supposed to be “big hair, sprayed hair.” Or maybe  “big hairsprayed hair.” But I have no firsthand (Note: It’s one word) knowledge of that.

I also have no firsthand knowledge of the writer’s reasoning for using need instead of the correct needs. Or for using both but and yet together. Is she being serious?

Barron Trump to attend exceptional school

Barron Trump, the youngest son of the current occupant of the Oval Office, is 11 years old. Next fall he’ll be attending a school for students aged up to 12, according to Yahoo! Style:

You might think it odd that he’ll be attending a school for just one year. But, it’s an exceptional school, for students in grades 9 to 12, also according to Yahoo!:

So, it looks like students complete grades up to 12, graduating from high school at the age of 12. Now, that’s an exceptional school. Unless… the writer got it wrong. The school serves students from age 2 to grade 12. Oops. That’s a  little different.

Are plastic tires next?

When I read this headline on Yahoo! Style, I pictured Ms. Johnson wearing shoes we commonly refer to as “jellies” or maybe the much-reviled Crocs;

But, noooo. They were shoes made by Gucci. And according to the article, they are plastic. Except where “they are made entirely of rubber”:

Maybe next we’ll be reading about truck tires made of plastic.

How many does it take?

How many errors does it take for a website to lose credibility. If you see three errors in a photo caption, like this one from Yahoo! Style, do you trust anything about the site?

The author is writing about Hillary Kerr, but can’t manage to spell her name right, nor the name of the websites Byrdie and Obsessee.

I’d give that caption an A+ for alternative facts and an F for accuracy. But wait! There’s more! The caption was reformatted and “corrected.” Except that two of three errors are still there:

Are you able to breathe?

Are you waiting for a Yahoo! Style article that is error-free? Don’t hold your breath. Relax, breathe, and read:

Were you blinded by the sunn when you wrote that?

It’s hard to believe that Yahoo! Style editors don’t proofread headlines before they’re published. Maybe the editor was blinded by the sun and didn’t have sunglasses when reading this:

Not a real designer

To most people Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons is a designer. To a Yahoo! Style writer she’s not a real designer — only an honorary designer, even though she’s the honored designer of the Met Gala:

Because not bearing skin is creepy

Of course Princess Tiana bore skin, because going without  skin is creepy and possibly impossible. But that’s what Yahoo! Style tells us:

Looking at the picture, I can attest to the fact that the princess seemed to be bearing all her skin, although with that short skirt she bared a lot of it.

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