Was it a Kaiser or egg roll?

What kind of roll did Bernie Sanders have at the Democratic National Convention? A Kaiser roll? An egg roll? Maybe it was a bagel. We’ll have to ask the person at Yahoo! News whose role is headline writer:

bernies roll news hp

Head over heels

Remember the saying “Time wounds all heels”? When my friends and I were in our teens, we used to think it has hilarious and a genius takeoff on the saying “Time heals all wounds.” We knew the difference between heals and heels, which is more than I can say for the staff at Yahoo! Finance:

heels fin

What’s your editor doing?

You probably don’t want to do what this editor for Yahoo! Sports did — mistaking you’re for your:

youre dad mlb

I don’t think the writer is confused by a possessive pronoun (like your) and a contraction (you’re, meaning “you are”). He did manage to use you’re correctly at the start of the sentence.

Is that a pleasure-school administrator?

The crucial difference between Yahoo! Style editors and the rest of the English-speaking world? Yahoo! Style editors don’t know the difference between a principal (which is a school administrator or something that is highest in rank or importance) and a principle (which is a rule or standard):

pleasure principal sty

They just had to put that headline in the largest font imaginable. But, minutes later, the editors changed it! When I saw that they had added a picture to that headline, I was hopeful that they’d also see the error of their ways. But, noooo:

pleasure sty

That’s altogether different

What the Yahoo! Sports meant was altogether; that’s altogether different from all together:

all together sport

Writing elicits guffaws from readers

What did the Yahoo! Sports writer do to elicit such a response? He did this:

illicit mlb

I almost spit out my nonfat, sugar-free vanilla latte when I read illicit (which means “improper or unlawful”) instead of elicit.

I’m shocked. Shocked, I tell you.

I wasn’t surprised when I saw that the news editor for Yahoo! Style used the word continuously (which means “without stop or interruption”) instead of continually (which means “recurring frequently”). It’s a common mistake among Yahoo! staffers. I wasn’t surprised when I read the next sentence — I was shocked.

uk sty 1

It is beyond my comprehension how anyone — anyone — could make a mistake that profoundly stupid. (Actually the rest of that sentence makes no sense, either. I guess this “news editor” thought Mrs. Cameron would stop wearing clothes from the United Kingdom because it was leaving itself.)

One out of two

If we were talking about baseball, a .500 batting average would be record-shattering. But this is yahoo.com, one of the most visited pages in the universe, and 50% isn’t good enough. Using two only once, instead of using it correctly twice, is akin to striking out:

fp to

It’s the principle of the thing

It’s entirely possible that the writer for Yahoo! Style is correct:

principle instructor sty

I suppose Ms. Mitchell might actually be a principle instructor, teaching people about some unnamed rule or law. It’s possible. But it’s not correct. Ms. Mitchell is a principal (or primary or chief) instructor.

I can’t remain neutral

I just can’t remain neutral about this color palate on Yahoo! Style:

color palate sty

The duchess might have a great palate, but that means that her sense of taste is refined. Her outfit, however tasteful, is in a neutral color palette.

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