Are you able to breathe?

Are you waiting for a Yahoo! Style article that is error-free? Don’t hold your breath. Relax, breathe, and read:

Because not bearing skin is creepy

Of course Princess Tiana bore skin, because going without  skin is creepy and possibly impossible. But that’s what Yahoo! Style tells us:

Looking at the picture, I can attest to the fact that the princess seemed to be bearing all her skin, although with that short skirt she bared a lot of it.

White House ain’t moving

The White House isn’t going anywhere, according to Yahoo! Style:

Is the White House stationary? Yes, but it’s not a source of handwritten letters. That would be White House stationery. If you have trouble remembering the difference between stationary and stationery, just remember both letter and stationery include the letters ER.

Holding up Kendall Jenner’s bum

I can’t bear it! The editors at Yahoo! Style are baring their ignorance with this homophonic gaffe:

I was going to crop this picture to eliminate the behind-baring dresses and the behinds. But I changed my mind. You’re welcome.

No clue. No clue at all

I know this teaser on the home page of Yahoo! Finance is wrong, but I have no clue how to make it right:

Donald Trump lead makes no sense to me, even if the editor had used the correct past tense of lead, which is led. Is there a word or two missing? Should this be: Donald Trump’s election led …? Who knows!?

Also, who knows why the editor chose to use data as a plural noun. Although data can be used with either a singular or a plural verb, except in the most technical cases, it’s treated as a singular noun denoting a mass quantity. Anyone Googling the word would see that recent data shows it’s most often used with a singular verb.

It took my breath away

Reading this from Yahoo! Finance practically took my breath away:

Maybe someone could breathe some life back into this article with a different word choice.

The principal writing principle

The principal (or most important) principle (or basic rule) of writing is to know something about the language you’re writing in. The writer for Yahoo! Style illustrates one possible outcome if you dare to violate that principle:

The head administrator of a high school is a principal. Didn’t we all learn in third grade: The principal is your pal?

 

This is altogether wrong

This use of all together on Yahoo! Finance is altogether wrong:

The expression all together indicates a group performing some action collectively. The word that means “completely, entirely” is altogether.

I just can’t go on

I tried reading an article on Yahoo! Style, but I just can’t force myself to read beyond the first paragraph. It is so stunningly awful in its grammatical mistakes and ignorance of basic English, that I gave up. Here’s what I found with just a cursory examination of the ‘graph; I’m sure I missed a few things that merit attention:

My experience tells me that this writer is not a native English-speaker. Her mistakes are ones that are common with people who did not grow up speaking and writing English. But there’s no excuse for not providing her with a competent editor, if only to save her from embarrassments like these:

  • 18 years old should be 18-year-old. He is 18 years old, but he is an 18-year-old model.
  • instagram follower should be Instagram followers.
  • on first name term seems to be a bastardization of on a first name basis.
  • to loose his cherries for the first time is not just a vulgar expression, it’s kind of a stupid metaphor. First, she means lose, not loose. And one can only lose one’s cherry (which is singular) once. So I’m really confused as to what this is purported to mean. Maybe it just means the writer is both careless and ignorant.
  • There’s a missing the in at Coachella music festival.
  • will also be is redundant when one ends a sentence with too.
  • been to famous music festival needs a the.

I’m sure I missed something, and I didn’t even touch on the run-on sentences. Please, Yahoo!, get this gal an editor!

Everyday error appears every day

It’s a common, ordinary, everyday-type of error that appears nearly every day on Yahoo! Style:

It’s seems that the editors just can’t remember that as one word, everyday means “common, ordinary”; as two words it means “each and every day.”

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