Everyday error appears every day

It’s a common, ordinary, everyday-type of error that appears nearly every day on Yahoo! Style:

It’s seems that the editors just can’t remember that as one word, everyday means “common, ordinary”; as two words it means “each and every day.”

Alter that word

The writer for Yahoo! Style altered the meaning of this sentence when she used alter instead of altar:

You’re so vain, you probably think this blog is about you

Ever wonder if the Yahoo! Style writers think this blog is all about them? Well, it practically is, since they make so many errors they seemed to be featured every day. In the same vein, there are lots more errors in other Yahoo! sites, but the ones on Style are the easiest to find, like this one:

in-the-same-vain-sty

Does this strike a chord?

This strikes a chord with me, and not in a good way. It’s an example from Yahoo! Style of a writer confusing a group of three notes (which is a chord) and  a string or rope (called a cord):

chords-sty

You know the old saying?

You know the old saying “it’s better to write fast than to write well”? No? That’s because I made it up after reading this on Yahoo! Style:

sleeves-sweater

I’m trying to come up with a reason for so many errors, like the missing punctuation in what should be ’70s, and the use of its for the  contraction it’s. And more missing punctuation and the misspelling of granddad. And why the writer would call this sweater a “sleeves sweater”:

sleeveless

It’s a sleeveless sweater or a vest or even a sweater vest.

But why so many errors? I can only surmise that the writer was under an incredible time crunch, that she’s not a great typist and that she hasn’t completely mastered English. And the company she works for has very, very low standards for content. Maybe even no standards.

Where did that come from?

What do you call an accessory that goes with everything you have on? A wherewithal!

Ha-ha. That riddle just popped into my teensy brain when I read this on Yaoo! Style:

where-sty-gaga

If this homophonic horror happened in a nineteenth century classroom, the writer would be sitting on a stool in the corner where she would be forced to wear a dunce cap.

 

I’m loath to say this, but I loathe this mistake

This is mistake is on my list of top 10 most loathed errors:

are-loathe-sty

If you mean reluctant or fearful (which is what I think the writer was going for), use loath. Reserve loathe for times when you really, really hate something. Like this writing.

Take a peek at this!

It piques my interest when I see a mistake like this one on Yahoo! Style:

sneak-peak-sty-3

Did the writer choose to use peak (instead of the correct peek) because of the spelling of sneak?

That’s altogether different

This Yahoo! Style writer should get a jump-start on her high school diploma and head over to a dictionary. She might learn that jump-start has a hyphen, workout is one word when it’s a noun and this sentence is altogether different from correct:

jumpstart-work-out-altogether-sty

Let’s say this all together: If you mean “totally, entirely, completely,” use altogether. Use all together when you mean “together, as a unit or whole.”

This is a shoo-in for worst mistake of the day

From Yahoo! Style:

shoe-in-style

The noun meaning a sure winner is shoo-in.

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