It’s it’s, but it should be its

It’s practically an everyday occurrence at Yahoo. Someone confuses its and it’s. This time it’s on Yahoo Finance for its mistake:

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That doesn’t jibe with the correct word

The writer for Yahoo Entertainment must have had jazz or swing music on her mind when she wrote this:

But that just doesn’t jibe with the correct usage of the word. Though lots of people confuse jive and jibe, most authorities say that only one means “agree, be in accord,” and that word is jibe.

It’s not everyday

It’s not every day you see something like this on yahoo.com — it only seems that way:

If it’s a commonplace, ordinary, everyday occurrence, it might happen every day.

Uncommonly confused words

Halloween-themed weddings are all the rage around this time of year. It also seems that boat-themed weddings are making inroads into the matrimonial biz, if you believe Yahoo Lifestyle:

Although that excerpt appeared in an article about “Halloweddings,” the author slipped in a mention about a scull-covered cake. Do you think she was a tad confused? A skull-covered cake might be more appropriate.

This is a skull-covered cake:

 

This is a scull:

It’s a little different, no? I’ll file this one under “Uncommonly Confused Words” because I’ve never seen anyone make that mistake before.

It’s wrong

It’s never too late to admit a mistake and Yahoo Lifestyle should admit its mistake here:

I wouldn’t even repeat the difference between it’s and its, because you know one’s a contraction and one’s a possessive pronoun.

Taking the wrong route

If you’ve been rooting around Yahoo News recently, you might have noticed this headline:

Someone needs to route the editor to a dictionary, which would explain the difference between rout (which means to defeat overwhelmingly) and route (which doesn’t).

It hasn’t fazed the editors

Yahoo renamed its Style site to Lifestyle. That might be an improvement. Unfortunately, the Internet giant didn’t improve on the quality of its writing and editing. Are you fazed by this homophonic horror?

Apparently this hasn’t fazed the editorial team at Yahoo.

Would that be a Kaiser or onion roll?

White privilege has played a roll, according to Yahoo! Style:

I’m just wondering what kind of roll it was. Was it a Kaiser roll, an onion roll, or an egg roll? I’m also wondering if an editor played a role in this homophonic hilarity.

I have nothing further to say

This appeared today on yahoo.com and nothing could be further from accurate than this use of farther:

Confused about the difference between further and farther? Here’s what the American Heritage Dictionary says:

Since the Middle English period many writers have used farther and further interchangeably. According to a relatively recent rule, however, farther should be reserved for physical distance and further for nonphysical, metaphorical advancement. Thus 74 percent of the Usage Panel prefers farther in the sentence If you are planning to drive any farther than Ukiah, you’d better carry chains, and 64 percent prefers further in the sentence We won’t be able to answer these questions until we are further along in our research.

Continually making an error

The folks at Yahoo! seem to make the same mistake continually. This time it’s Yahoo! News scribes who can’t tell the difference between continuously and continually:

I wasn’t in the Senate to verify this for myself, but I’m guessin’ that the legislation wasn’t being amended ceaselessly, without stop. But it may have been continually amended.

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