A blend of old and new

Here’s a blend of old and new on Yahoo! Style:

Using the wrong word is an old error on Yahoo!, but using the expression blend between instead of blend of is a new error.

What rich people look like

Displaying a remarkable ability to tell a person’s financial worth by a mere picture, the writer for Yahoo! Style declares the cast of a Las Vegas show “well-heeled”:

Here’s the picture that led to that bit of wisdom:

Can you tell that they’re wealthy? Or would you use a different word to describe them? Maybe one that you actually know the meaning of and that actually applies to the picture. Then maybe you can tell the writer that well-heeled means prosperous or wealthy.

Not a high school graduate?

I’m questioning this Yahoo! Style writer’s education. Do you think he graduated from high school? I’d expect that someone with a high school diploma (or even a GED) would know that you can’t graduate high school, or college, or even kindergarten.

Students graduate from school; schools graduate students.

Blades schmades

You might call them shoulders, but to this Yahoo! Style writer, they’re shoulder blades:

Here’s that suit with its “aggressive shoulder blades”:

Those are some shoulder pads! One might even call them “aggressive.” Perhaps that’s what this writer, with her ignorance on basic human anatomy, meant.

No clue. No clue at all

I know this teaser on the home page of Yahoo! Finance is wrong, but I have no clue how to make it right:

Donald Trump lead makes no sense to me, even if the editor had used the correct past tense of lead, which is led. Is there a word or two missing? Should this be: Donald Trump’s election led …? Who knows!?

Also, who knows why the editor chose to use data as a plural noun. Although data can be used with either a singular or a plural verb, except in the most technical cases, it’s treated as a singular noun denoting a mass quantity. Anyone Googling the word would see that recent data shows it’s most often used with a singular verb.

Hedging her bets

Not sure how to form the possessive of kids? Not sure if the apostrophe goes before or after the S? Do what the writer for Yahoo! Style did and hedge your bets: Put the apostrophe before and after it:

Left to her own devices

Without benefit of a competent editor, the Yahoo! Style writer was left to her own devices. So she came up with a statement that’s just not right:

It took my breath away

Reading this from Yahoo! Finance practically took my breath away:

Maybe someone could breathe some life back into this article with a different word choice.

What if there were triplets?

If the possessive of single is single’s, and the possessive of twins is twins’s (at least according to Yahoo! Style), is the  possessive of triplet, triplets’s’s?

After reading this

After reading this, I realized that the Yahoo! Style writer doesn’t know what a dangling participle is:

According to that sentence, paramedics revived the child — which would be a little challenging since they allegedly performed that miracle after arriving at her location.

The dangling participial phrase “after reviving the child” requires a subject, which the reader expects to find immediately after the phrase. Thus, the writer (and her accomplice, the editor) told us it was paramedics. The correct wording would be something like: After the officer revived the child.

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