That’s a new one

I’ve seen all kinds of misuse of the apostrophe, but this one on yahoo.com take’s the cake:

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According to dictionaries…

According to dictionaries, Yahoo News editors can’t spell meteorologists:

That just tanked

This intro to an Instagram star on Yahoo Lifestyle just tanked:

This is Tank McNamara, a comic strip character:

George Resch is known as Tank Sinatra.

It’s wrong

It’s never too late to admit a mistake and Yahoo Lifestyle should admit its mistake here:

I wouldn’t even repeat the difference between it’s and its, because you know one’s a contraction and one’s a possessive pronoun.

Change the Y to I

Didn’t we all learn this in third grade: To form the plural of a word ending in a consonant and Y, change the Y to I and add ES. No, we didn’t. At least the writer and editor for Yahoo Lifestyle didn’t learn that:

Not only did they miss it, their spell-checker missed it, too. Unless they don’t actually have a spell-checker.

What editors got wrong on Yahoo News

Maybe it’s just a typo to the editors at Yahoo News, but to the readers it’s a red flag:

Can you trust a source that doesn’t require proofreading on its home page and that doesn’t even use a spell-checker?

Don’t confuse lyrics with words

Gosh, I feel really stupid. All my life I’ve thought that lyrics were the words of a song. According to Yahoo Lifestyle, word and lyrics are two totally different things:

OK, I’ll also admit I don’t know what the writer meant by the word word. Was the writer referring to Mr. Petty’s promise (as in “he kept his word”) or to actual words (as in “lyrics of a song”)? I’m so confused.

Taking the wrong route

If you’ve been rooting around Yahoo News recently, you might have noticed this headline:

Someone needs to route the editor to a dictionary, which would explain the difference between rout (which means to defeat overwhelmingly) and route (which doesn’t).

I think I’ve found it!

My previous blog post noted a missing apostrophe on the front page of Yahoo News. I think I’ve found it. It turned up in a headline on Yahoo Lifestyle:

The apostrophe simply doesn’t belong there. When faced with a similar situation — a length of time preceding an adjective — don’t include the apostrophe. (But if the time period modifies a noun, it gets an apostrophe: one day’s pay, ten years’ experience.

If that’s too grammar-geeky a rule for you, try this: Replace the length of time with the singular: one month pregnant sounds right; one month’s pregnant doesn’t. So, no apostrophe in the plural. Of course this method requires that you have an “ear” for correct English.

What were limited?

I’m soooo confused by Yahoo News. What were the things that “were limited”?

To me it looks like the editors were limited in their proofreading skills. And the readers? We’re limited in our comprehension, due to a missing apostrophe.

Punctuation matters.

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