Can a movie reunite?

Can a movie reunite for a documentary? I can’t see how, yet that’s what it says on the Yahoo! front page:

fp bill and ted

Seems impossible, no? What’s more likely is that the characters Bill and Ted (without the quotation marks) are reuniting. With quotation marks, “Bill & Ted” is a shortened movie title.

What’s it really called?

The makers of Mountain Dew are coming out with a new beverage, and according to Yahoo! Finance it’s not called “DewShine.” I guess that’s its code name or a nickname, because why else would you put quotation marks around the name? It’s like “Pepsi” or “Coca-Cola” or “Barbie.” See how stupid product names look with quotation marks?

dewshine quo fin

It wasn’t enough to include “DewShine” in the video; they had to include it in the article, too. And I guess if you think “DewShine” is correct, you might think that moonshine is two words. It isn’t.

dewshine moon shine fin

Fifty shades of Grey? Is that your question?

No, no, no. Somehow writers and editors at Yahoo! got the idea that terminating punctuation always goes before a closing quotation mark. To prove my assertion (as if one more example is proof), here’s a headline from Yahoo! Movies:

grey apos ques mov

In the U.S., commas and periods go before the closing quote mark. Colons and semicolons go after the quote mark. But exclamation marks and question marks can go before or after the quotation mark, depending on meaning. A question mark goes before the closing quote mark only if the words within the quotation marks are an actual question. That means that the writer thinks “Fifty shades of Grey” is the question. It is not.

What is ‘Walking Dead’ character’s real name?

Did you think the “gentle giant” on the TV show “The Walking Dead” was called Tyreese? You’d be wrong. According to the folks at the Yahoo! front page, that was a nickname or a pseudonym or something else:

fp tyreese

Ha-ha. I kid. I am a kidder. The character is Tyreese and the mistake is Yahoo!’s by putting quotation marks around the name. They just don’t belong there. It’s like referring to the Shakespearean characters as “Romeo” and “Juliet.”

Is that your question?

If the question in this headline on Yahoo! Movies is “Secretary?” then this punctuation is correct:

secretary quest quot movies

But, of course, the whole sentence is the question, so the question mark belongs after the closing quotation mark.

Back off the punctuation!

Here’s something you don’t see often, three consecutive punctuation marks:

colon parent

I don’t know the thinking behind all those little symbols on Yahoo! Parenting, but at least one of them is in the wrong place. If the writer insists on using both quotation marks and a colon, then the colon should go after the closing quotation mark. It is one of two punctuation characters that always go after a closing quotation mark in the U.S.; the other is the semicolon.

That’s not where it goes

Where does the question mark go? Not where they put it on the Yahoo! front page:

fp interview quest quot

Unless the question is Interview?, then the question mark belongs after the closing quotation mark.

Do bottle cops enforce recycling?

What is the role of bottle cops in today’s society? Do they make sure you’re recycling that Diet Snapple bottle? Do they monitor the number of ounces in a 12-ounce bottle of Aquafina? Perhaps the answer is locked away in the mind of the Yahoo! DIY editor responsible for this little excerpt:

bottle cops

She might also be able to explain why she put the period after the closing quotation mark, when the standard in the U.S. is before it. And perhaps she’ll tell us if “the humans” is different from “humans” or just plain people. The humans seem to be dumping waste into something that resembles the environment. Maybe we should report them to the bottle cops

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” we find that writers for yahoo.com can’t agree of computer body is an unfamiliar term, an ironic term, or maybe a nickname. Couldn’t they at least agree on whether it needed to be in quotation marks? No.

fp computer body

If it end’s in S, it need’s an apostrophe

That seems to be the editorial mantra at Yahoo! Style: Any word that ends in an S, even a name, must include an apostrophe before the S:

lily collins style

There is no other way to explain something like that. Unless it’s an acute case of carelessness, ignorance, and/or idiocy. While I’m at it, maybe someone will explain to me what “Love, Rosie” is doing in the middle of that sentence. Is it the title of a movie? If so, it needs quotation marks or italics — something to make it distinct from the rest of the text. It’s not a showstopping error, but spelling showstopping as two words is.

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