Chris Brown and Tyga share kids

Somehow Chris Brown (who I understand is sometimes referred to as “Breezy”) and Tyga (who is sometimes referred to as a “rapper”) have children together. Who knew? The writer for Yahoo! Celebrity knew:

breezy and tygas

Of course, it’s possible the writer is grammatically challenged and meant to refer to Breezy’s and Tyga’s kids. That would be Breezy’s kid and Tyga’s kid.

If two people together own something, you just need to give an apostrophe and S to the second of the two: Mom and dad’s home; Bill and Hillary’s daughter. But if they each own something separately, each gets the apostrophe and S treatment: Mom’s and dad’s jobs; Bill’s and Hillary’s careers.

And then I fell asleep

It must be so exhausting to write for Yahoo! Makers that the writer fell asleep before completing this photo caption:

plate setting diy

Clearly the writer wasn’t tired from searching the dictionary for the correct words to use. If she had tried looking up plate setting she would have found it doesn’t exist in the American Heritage Dictionary. The combination of plate and utensils for one person is called a place setting. Let’s hope that next time she’s a little less drained and she takes care to match a verb to a singular subject (like jar).

A Hall of Fame error

Do the Dallas Cowboys have a plan for Randy Gregory? Or does the team have plans? You just can’t tell because of this mismatch of subject and verb on Yahoo! Sports:

plan include spo

That’s not exactly an error for the Hall of Fame of Grammar Goofs, but hyphenating Hall of Fame is.

Don’t dangle that in public

Ever wonder how investors can drive up a piece of artwork? Me neither. We don’t wonder that because it makes no sense, even if you read it on the Yahoo! front page:

fp driven up

Investors can drive up the price of artwork. And they did. But the dangling participle (that would be driven) and its participial phrase modifies the noun that follows it — and that would be piece. And that would be stupid.

No wonder they’re laughing

Did the Cleveland Indians’ players read this on the Yahoo! front page? Is that why they’re laughing?

fp indianss

In the United States, team names are treated as plurals, so it makes no sense to form the plural of a team name by adding an apostrophe and an S. If the name ends in an S, we just add an apostrophe. That’s what we do in the U.S., but the style may be different in the country where this was written.

Based on your word choice…

Based on her word choice, I’d say the writer for Yahoo! Style is grammatically challenged:

based off of sty

The first clue was the use of the singular pronoun it to refer to a plural antecedent (images). The correct pronoun is they. The second clue was the expression based off of, which is just wrong. The correct expression is based on.

Why not me?

Does this sound right to you? It obviously sounds right to the Yahoo! Makers writer:

for i diy

But it’s wrong. No, not the “for Meredith and” part; just the use of the pronoun I. The correct pronoun is me, the objective case of the pronoun I and the object of the preposition for.

How many is a number?

The number of errors on yahoo.com reaches a level that hasn’t been seen since yesterday at noon. Here’s one more:

fp number reach

A number of these errors are avoidable by simply employing an editor with a thorough understanding of grammar.

The American Heritage Dictionary describes how to choose the correct verb to use with the noun number:

As a collective noun number may take either a singular or a plural verb. It takes a singular verb when it is preceded by the definite article the: The number of skilled workers is increasing. It takes a plural verb when preceded by the indefinite article a: A number of the workers have learned new skills.

More games amount to more than one

Was the writer for the Yahoo! front page unable to figure out that games is plural? More grammar errors and having to face disgruntled readers amount to one amateurish webpage requiring a little editorial support:

fp amounts

Writers who forget grammar

What do you think of writers who forget grammar and can’t match a verb to its subject? I’m thinkin’ of the person behind this grammatical goof on yahoo.com:

fp preys

Is that just a careless typo, a slip of a digit? Or is that an indication of a deeper, more serious attention deficit disorder when it comes to grammar?

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