Neither is singular

The writer and editor for Yahoo! Sports gave this sentence the thumbs-up. But neither was correct:

neither have been mlb

As a pronoun, neither is singular.

Did you really mean to write did?

I’m fatally unhip and tragically pop-culturally challenged, so maybe I’m wrong. Maybe this headline on the home page of Yahoo! Beauty isn’t a sign of the apocalypse; maybe it’s just a sign of current slang:

nails did bea

The problem? If you’re going to use slang and you don’t want to look like a moron, grammatically speaking, you need to have established a reputation for publishing perfect prose, free of misspellings, grammatical gaffes, and punctuation problems. Then, when you choose to write incorrectly for comedic or dramatic effect, your readers get it. But if you write for Yahoo!, where hundreds of mistakes are made every day, don’t use slang. You’ll look as ignorant as this writer.

Both her writing and her editing were wrong

What does it take to be a news editor for Yahoo! Style? Certainly not a knowledge of grammar, as evidenced by this excerpt:

was subdued sty

The man of whom we speak

There’s at least one person who writes for a living, but has only a tenuous grasp of English grammar. Of course, the man of whom we speak is the Yahoo! Sports writer responsible for this:

of who mlb

A wave of offenders

Every day there are a number of mistakes on Yahoo!. Some days see a lot more offending text than others. This wave of offenders has already brought at least one mismatched subject-verb pair on Yahoo! Sports:

wave have mlb

But wait! There’s more!

When she’s not confusing her right hand with her left (see today’s first post), the “news editor” for Yahoo! Style is confusing her readers. She’s also kinda insulting them with her disregard for niceties like punctuation, accurate spelling, and correct grammar.

Omitting a comma isn’t the worst offense in this paragraph, the ungrammatical were (which should be was) is. Or maybe it’s the inability to spell Ms. Wohlfahrt’s name correctly more than once:

tek sty 1

Each of those mistakes was made by a professional writer, who again thinks that each is a plural and that Ms. Wohlfahrt is someone named Wolfhart:

tek sty 2

But wait! There’s more! Once more the editor displays a woeful ignorance of grammar and the name of the subject she’s writing about:

tek sty 3

Where else can one person make so many mistakes in front of so many people and get paid for it?

Whoever did it should be embarrassed

There’s a dearth of competent editors over at Yahoo! Sports. Heck, there may be no editors at the website because any editor would know that the nominative case he is wrong following a preposition like between:

between he 1

Any editor would know that there’s a word missing in what should be a couple of years:

between he 2

And why can’t the writer and/or editor choose correct pronouns? The pronoun whomever is the objective case of whoever, which is the word the writer should have used since it’s the subject of the sentence.

Whoever wrote or edited this article should be embarrassed.

Neither is correct

In this excerpt from Yahoo! Sports, neither or nor are is correct:

neither or are mlb

The correlative conjunction pair is neither…nor, not neither…or. And when neither…nor joins two nouns as the subject of a sentence, the verb (which should be is denying) must agree with the noun closer to it (which is Gordon).

Editing and proofreading are the perfect combination

Editing and proofreading are the perfect combination to avoid the kind of grammatical error like this one from Yahoo! Style:

was sty

Striking the wrong chord

Nothing in this photo caption on Yahoo! Style hits the right note or strikes a chord with me:

hit cord sty

I’m embarrassed for the writer. She managed to screw up a common expression in two ways: The expression is “hit the right note” or “strike a chord” (but she can’t even use the correct homophone in the latter). It’s followed in the same sentence with a mismatched subject and verb. And to prove that she’s not just grammatically and verbally impaired, she shows that she knows little about the subject of this mess by misspelling Céline. I’ve read high school newspapers that are better written and edited than this.

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