Shortest pants ever?

If you’re a writer for Yahoo! Style, a site that’s about women and fashion (and some other things that defy categorization), shouldn’t you know something about, well, fashion? Apparently not. Here we see a photo caption that describes what must be the shortest pants ever worn by an adult:

inseam sty

Anyone who has ever worn, bought, or seen pants knows that the inseam is the length of the pants from the crotch to the hem; it is the length of the seam on the inside of the leg. Makes sense. So, what was the genius writer describing in this photo?

inseam pic

I’m guessin’ she was referring to the rise, the distance from the top of the waistband to the crotch. Or maybe she was describing a whole different outfit which we are not privileged to see.

I’d be pissed, too!

I’d be pissed, too if a video of my husband (drunk or not) removing my garter belt went viral. So after reading this on Yahoo! Style, who could blame the bride for suing the videographer?

garter belt wend

Most brides wear a garter on their wedding day. It’s worn on the thigh and looks kind of like this:

garter blue

A garter belt is an actual belt, worn around (or just below) the waist, like this:

garter belt pic 2

I don’t know why the groom was going after that particular garment, exposing more of his bride than modesty permits. Oh, wait! I do know why! He wasn’t trying to remove a garter belt, just a garter. Once again I’ve been duped by a dope who knows nothing of women’s undergarments.

Not a high school graduate?

Doesn’t every high school graduate know that the pronoun who refers to human beings? Apparently not. There must be colleges that accept applicants who don’t know that and at least one editor at yahoo.com who’s unaware of the rule:

fp colleges who

Almost right

Almost every reader of Yahoo! Sports would question this wording, wouldn’t they?

most every nba

It struck me as just plain wrong to use most instead of almost. But apparently some authorities consider it acceptable in informal speech, but advise against using it in formal writing. And almost all of them also add: It’s best to use almost, rather than most, in similar situations, like almost everyone, almost everybody, almost everything.

Talk about abrupt!

If there’s anything in this world that is abrupt, it’s this sentence on yahoo.com:

fo abrupt of

I think it’s like the word game Mad Libs, except readers are supposed to supply the missing word or words. So, gimme a noun and we’ll plug it into “the abrupt noun of Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.”

Capital punishment

Stop. comparing. me. to. an. editor.

That could have been written by the editor at yahoo.com who isn’t clear when to capitalize mother:

fp my mother

Here’s a hint: Don’t capitalize mother, father, sister, and the like if the word is preceded by an adjective. So, it’s my mother, a great father, my mean-girl sister.

Copy-paste is your friend

How is it possible in a world of online words, that the writer for Yahoo! Style didn’t know enough to copy and paste a quote into the article she was writing? She apparently typed the quote and screwed it up rather badly:

supported sty

You might wonder why the American Immigration Council, which is opposed to Donald J. Trump’s immigration policies, said that they were “supported by the facts.” That’s because the council did not say that. They wrote, “Trump’s now well-established views on immigration policy are not only unsupported by the facts, but they are dangerous as well.” I’m pretty sure I got that right because I copied the words from the council’s website and pasted them into this post.

What could you ask a dress code?

Oh, to be a fly on the wall when a student made a formal request of a dress code. What could she ask for? What did the dress code say? And why am I talking about this? Because I read this on Yahoo! Style:

petitions sty hp

This is yet another case of an editor with a vocabulary deficit. She clearly has no idea what petition means and how to use it. As a verb petition means to ask for (by a petition) or to make a request. Maybe the student petitioned the school administration concerning the dress code. Maybe the student opposed the school dress code. Maybe the writer would learn some basic English.

Everyday error appears (almost) every day

It’s a common, everyday experience: Someone at Yahoo! Style uses the wrong word. This time an editor confused everyday (which means commonplace, ordinary, or routine) with every day (which means each day):

everyday style hp

Hocked? I’m shocked!

I’m shocked, but probably shouldn’t be. This Yahoo! Style writer (and her editor, if she has one) thinks that hocked means sold:

hocked sty

It does not. The verb hock means to pawn, as in, “she hocked her dictionary at the local pawn shop because she felt she didn’t need it.” The verb the writer should have used is hawked.

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