It’s it’s, but it should be its

It’s practically an everyday occurrence at Yahoo. Someone confuses its and it’s. This time it’s on Yahoo Finance for its mistake:

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Forth what it’s Worth . . .

This is probably a common typo involving the Texas city of Fort Worth. But the fact that it appears on one of the most visited pages on the Internet — yahoo.com — makes it a real embarrassment:

Warning: Profanity ahead

Warning: This headline from Yahoo News contains content unsuitable for children:

Lots of news outlets are now including the profane words of America’s current president, as if it were acceptable speech. But most of them are also using correct grammar and are able to match a verb and its subject. Some of them also follow standard guidelines and don’t capitalize the word senator unless it directly precedes a senator’s name.

Real entertainment

The real entertainment in Yahoo Entertainment comes from the typos on its home page:

For those outside the United States (and possibly for some people in the United States), we do not hold elections retroactively. Presidential elections are held every four years, and only in years whose last two digits are divisible by four. So, the next election for president is 2020.  Seems like Trevor Noah knows more about our elections than the folks at Yahoo.

Writing and editing are exciting

OK, so maybe writing and editing aren’t exciting — at least not all the time. Perhaps if the editors at Yahoo Lifestyle found them exciting, we wouldn’t be subjected to this:

Pleading or pledging

Readers could be pleading with the editors at Yahoo Lifestyle to employ a proofreader, or at least a spell-checker:

Fake news!

There’s something fishy on the home page of Yahoo News:

I can’t figure out if it was the Tuscan police who released footage or the Tucson police. Judging from the fact that the incident occurred in Arizona, I’m going with the latter.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of errors

If I had a nickel for every error on Yahoo, I’d have hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of coins. Missing apostrophes, like those on Yahoo Finance, would contribute to my stash:

Sometimes a word ending in S looks like a plural, but it’s really a quasi possessive. This is a case of a quasi possessive. (It’s also an example of the genitive case, which is more grammar than I like.) If you’re unsure whether you’re faced with a simple plural or a quasi possessive, try this: Substitute the number 1 for the number in the phrase. So, instead of “millions of dollars worth,” try “one dollars worth.” Notice that I used dollars, and not dollar, because that sounds right to me. But of course it’s not a plural, so it must be a possessive: one dollar’s worth. This method depends on having an “ear” for correct language, something Yahoo writers seem to lack.

 

 

Which states would that be?

Which states did the plane return to? According to Yahoo Entertainment, a plane carrying Chrissy Teigen “headed back to the states.” But I can’t find any info on the states it returned to:

If the writer meant the plane returned to the United States (and I presume she did), then she should have capitalized states. That way it’s clear to readers she was referring to the country.

That doesn’t jibe with the correct word

The writer for Yahoo Entertainment must have had jazz or swing music on her mind when she wrote this:

But that just doesn’t jibe with the correct usage of the word. Though lots of people confuse jive and jibe, most authorities say that only one means “agree, be in accord,” and that word is jibe.

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