Trudging and plodding along

Was the Yahoo! Style trying to be clever with a mashup of trudging and plodding to come up with this non-word?

trodding-along-sty

Or did she (and her editor) really think that’s a word? Well, it’s not.

Based on my knowledge of English

Based on my knowledge of English, I’d say that this Yahoo! Style writer has trouble with common idioms (like based on) and likes to use redundant words (like off of):

based-off-of-sty-z

That’s quite a claim

Sometimes separating a number from the words that explain it, isn’t such a bright idea. Take this excerpt from Yahoo! Finance:

less-than-claimed-fin

You might think, as I did, that $29,000 was 67% less than claimed earnings of $90,000. Then you might think, as I did, that $29,000 was the real median. And then you’d reread the sentence to reassure yourself that the real median was $61,000, or 33% less than claimed. Or maybe $61,000—67% of the amount claimed. But not, 67% less than claimed.

I’m starting to get a headache. I think I’ll go take 4 or 5 Advil and go lie down.

She’s not a prima donna

No, she’s not a prima donna, according to Yahoo! Style. She’s a misspelled primadonna:

primadonna-sty

Here’s a wise word of wisdom for ya’

Here’s a word of wisdom for the Yahoo! Style editor: Consult a dictionary about the meaning of the words you use. Perhaps then you’d learn that “wise words” are the only kind that come with wisdom:

wise-wisdom-sty-hp

You couldn’t have just said “wise words” or “words of wisdom” or just “wisdom”? Apparently not.

And here’s another bit of wisdom for ya’: Take some pride in your writing and try to spell the name of your subject correctly. She’s Lea Michele. Spelling her name wrong is worse than “wise words of wisdom.”

Your attendance at an English class is recommended

Attendance at an English class is recommended for this Yahoo! Style, who has a little problem with a little word:

attendance-to

Ladies first

I guess elementary schools don’t teach the same things nowadays that they did when I was a youngster. Of course, that was many, many decades ago, but I thought there were some subjects that were eternal. Like how to form the plural of nouns. Judging from this excerpt from Yahoo! Style, schools are neglecting that bit of knowledge — or the writer was playing hooky that day:

ladies-room-sty

The possessive plural of lady is ladies’. It follows a simple rule: Form the plural of the noun and if it ends in S, add an apostrophe. So, it’s idiots’ and dummies’. If the plural doesn’t end in S, add an apostrophe and S: So women’s, children’s, and alumni’s are correct.

A series of mistakes

The series of mistake in Yahoo! News leaves me dumbfounded:

series-leave-new

The word series is both singular and plural. If you’re referring to a single series, it’s singular and takes a singular verb like leaves.

This seams wrong

If you believed what you read on Yahoo! Style (and why would you, really?) you’d expect pins along the hemline of this gal’s pants:

hemline-sty

But if you looked at the accompanying photo, you’d realize that the writer doesn’t know the difference between a hem and a seam:

hemline-pic

This is a shoo-in for worst mistake of the day

From Yahoo! Style:

shoe-in-style

The noun meaning a sure winner is shoo-in.

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