Exactly the same except for the differences

Editors at Yahoo Lifestyle seem to have a different definition of “matching” than I do. Here’s what I mean:

See that headline? It refers to these “matching” dresses:

Did you notice that the dresses are alike except for the color. And the belt. And the sleeves. And the length. And the neckline. And the layers on the skirt. And the details on the bodice. And the train. So if you overlook those little items, they are indeed matching dresses. So maybe I’m just being picky. Or maybe the editor doesn’t know what “matching” means.

 

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Uncommonly confused words

Halloween-themed weddings are all the rage around this time of year. It also seems that boat-themed weddings are making inroads into the matrimonial biz, if you believe Yahoo Lifestyle:

Although that excerpt appeared in an article about “Halloweddings,” the author slipped in a mention about a scull-covered cake. Do you think she was a tad confused? A skull-covered cake might be more appropriate.

This is a skull-covered cake:

 

This is a scull:

It’s a little different, no? I’ll file this one under “Uncommonly Confused Words” because I’ve never seen anyone make that mistake before.

Maybe at the at the isn’t a such big deal

Maybe a repeated word or two on the home page of Yahoo Lifestyle isn’t the worst mistake one could make:

It’s just the most obvious, and one easily caught by a proofreader, editor, or anyone familiar with English. But on the same page, there’s a little problem with the order of words:

Maybe that isn’t such a big deal; it’s just another mistake that should have been eliminated before it made it into our consciences.

 

Who do you trust?

Do you trust a site like Yahoo News after reading this on its front page?

Sloppy (or no) proofreading? Or reliance of a spell checker? Either way, a typo undermines the credibility of any news site. Careful proofreading by a literate human being is a bulwark against typos.

That’s a new one

I’ve seen all kinds of misuse of the apostrophe, but this one on yahoo.com take’s the cake:

That just tanked

This intro to an Instagram star on Yahoo Lifestyle just tanked:

This is Tank McNamara, a comic strip character:

George Resch is known as Tank Sinatra.

It’s wrong

It’s never too late to admit a mistake and Yahoo Lifestyle should admit its mistake here:

I wouldn’t even repeat the difference between it’s and its, because you know one’s a contraction and one’s a possessive pronoun.

Change the Y to I

Didn’t we all learn this in third grade: To form the plural of a word ending in a consonant and Y, change the Y to I and add ES. No, we didn’t. At least the writer and editor for Yahoo Lifestyle didn’t learn that:

Not only did they miss it, their spell-checker missed it, too. Unless they don’t actually have a spell-checker.

What editors got wrong on Yahoo News

Maybe it’s just a typo to the editors at Yahoo News, but to the readers it’s a red flag:

Can you trust a source that doesn’t require proofreading on its home page and that doesn’t even use a spell-checker?

Don’t confuse lyrics with words

Gosh, I feel really stupid. All my life I’ve thought that lyrics were the words of a song. According to Yahoo Lifestyle, word and lyrics are two totally different things:

OK, I’ll also admit I don’t know what the writer meant by the word word. Was the writer referring to Mr. Petty’s promise (as in “he kept his word”) or to actual words (as in “lyrics of a song”)? I’m so confused.

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