Take a peek at this!

It piques my interest when I see a mistake like this one on Yahoo! Style:

sneak-peak-sty-3

Did the writer choose to use peak (instead of the correct peek) because of the spelling of sneak?

That’s altogether different

This Yahoo! Style writer should get a jump-start on her high school diploma and head over to a dictionary. She might learn that jump-start has a hyphen, workout is one word when it’s a noun and this sentence is altogether different from correct:

jumpstart-work-out-altogether-sty

Let’s say this all together: If you mean “totally, entirely, completely,” use altogether. Use all together when you mean “together, as a unit or whole.”

This is a shoo-in for worst mistake of the day

From Yahoo! Style:

shoe-in-style

The noun meaning a sure winner is shoo-in.

Other mistakes pale in comparison

I love sharing my classy spirits and bubbly, so I was interested in this description of a gift on Yahoo! Style:

pale-sty-1

I assumed the writer meant bubbly (which is slang for champagne) and not bubbles, but with Yahoo! writers, you never know… Anyhoo, here’s that “Champagne pale”:

pale-pail-pic

Now the American Heritage Dictionary says that when you’re writing about that sparkling white wine, it’s champagne, but the region it comes from is Champagne. Maybe the writer uses a different authority for spelling and capitalization. That could happen.

The item in question sure does look pale; in fact its color is very, very light. You might even call it a “pale pail” — that is, if you knew the difference between pale and a pail.

And then I wrote then

The Yahoo! Style writers seem to have problems with some common words. They’re more error-prone than the typical professional writer, often writing then when they mean than:

more-flattering-then-sty

And then I wrote then

Writing is easier than you think — that is, if you think. The Yahoo! Style writer probably thought this was correct, but he was wrong:

then-you-think-sty

Ashley Graham: Unstopping!

Ashley Graham is quite the gal. She’s a vocal advocate for body positivity, which seems to be a social movement that’s the opposite of an anti-body. Anyhoo, a Yahoo! Style writer tells us she’s an untiring advocate, an advocate who never stops, not even to eat a bologna sandwich. (Not that I’m suggesting she eats bologna sandwiches. I don’t know. She might be a vegan.)

continuously-sty

Her advocacy is continuous, meaning that it is uninterrupted. If she took a break once in a while, then she’d be acting continually.

A capital question!

Here’s a question for ya’: Did the Yahoo! Style writer mean this “mock inauguration scene” purportedly took place in the U.S. capital? Or in the U.S. Capitol?

us-capital-sty

The U.S. capital (with a small C and two A’s) is Washington D.C. The U.S. Capitol (with a capital C, one A, and one O) is a building in the capital that houses Congress.

Prime minister heartbreaker

Is that a heartbreaking prime minister on “Walking Dead” or did the editors at yahoo.com confuse premier (which is a prime minister) with the word that means “first public performance,” or premiere?

fp-premier

Yeah, you’re right; it’s the latter.

Who is your writing crush?

Do you have a crush on a writer? I don’t. But if I did, it wouldn’t be this Yahoo! Style writer who can’t construct a grammatically correct question and can’t tell the difference between loose (which rhymes with noose) and lose (which rhymes with news), which is the word she should have used:

loose-sty

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