Were they Alps?

Oh, those sneak peaks! You just can’t trust ’em. Be they Himalayas, Alps, Sierras. It doesn’t matter — some peaks just love to sneak. Just take a peek at this peaks on Yahoo! Style:

sneak peaks sty

Just because the words sneak and peek rhyme, don’t assume that they’re spelled similarly, unless you’re referring to mountains. Now those would be peaks.

That is not right

If you’re following these instructions on Yahoo! Makers, you may be stumped when it comes to step 3:

ie mak

Well, I guess that instruction would work if your initials and the initials of your beloved are K.B. and W.C. Otherwise, you’re screwed. Who wants a keepsake with someone else’s initials burned into it?

Of course, an editor familiar with common abbreviations (even those taken from Latin words) would have changed that i.e. to something else. A competent editor would know that i.e. stands for id est, meaning “that is or namely.” It’s often confused with e.g., which is the abbreviation that means “for example.” But why use an abbreviation at all? If you’re a Yahoo! writer, you’re sure to use the wrong one and your reader might not understand either one. So, go with real English words; for example, for example.

Whose mistake is that?

There are writers at Yahoo! Celebrity whose mistakes are obvious to even the most casual reader. The writer who’s made this goof is one of them:

whos apos cel

The possessive form of who is whose; who’s is a contraction of who is or who has.

That’s altogether different

Let’s say this all together: That’s altogether wrong, Yahoo! Sports!

all together spor

If you mean “utterly, completely, entirely,” use altogether. If you’re referring to a group doing something as a unit, use all together.

Gender identify confusion

It seems that the Yahoo! Parenting writer has a little confusion about the gender of a woman’s betrothed:

fiancee par

A fiancée (with two E’s) is a female. This stay-at-home mother is engaged to a man; he is her fiancé.

Juuuuust a bit outside

I was merely trying to lure in lovers of the Charlie Sheen movie “Major League” with one of my favorite quotes. Anyone familiar with “Major League” lore knows that one.  Anyone familiar with English knows that the Yahoo! Sports writer doesn’t know his lure from his lore:

lure spo

Here’s some advice

Here’s a little advice for the Yahoo! News writer: Try using a dictionary.

council news

A council is an assembly of people. As a noun counsel refers to a lawyer or lawyers. And lest you think that the writer had a momentary brain hiccup, here it is again:

council news 2

I intend to follow the advice of a dictionary — not this writer’s example.

Are they opposed to diversity?

Something…something…something… followed by a claim that somebody is “upping the diversity anti,” by which they mean, increasing the opposition to diversity. I think. One can never be sure what a writer means when reading Yahoo! Style:

upping anti sty

It’s also possible that the writer doesn’t know that there is an idiom “upping the ante,” and it means raising the stakes. It’s derived from poker, where the ante is amount that each player must throw into the pot before the cards are dealt.

Lightening the load

The Yahoo! Style “marketing editor” should be lightening this spelling of lightning by removing the E:

lightening bolts sty

What it’s like to be wrong

Here’s what it’s like to be wrong on the home page of Yahoo! Style:

divorcee sty hp

The writer obviously didn’t study French in high school, assuming the writer attended high school. The word for a divorced woman is divorcée; a divorced man is a divorcé. There is no such thing as a divorceé.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,081 other followers

%d bloggers like this: