Where do you get your information?

When you’re looking for reliable information about investing, finance, or business, what website do you turn to? Yahoo! Finance? If you’re like most people, you’re adversely influenced by the number of mistakes, no matter how minor, you find. Typos, misspellings, and grammar mistakes all erode the credibility of a website or an article.

So, how credible do you find this article, where the writer apparently knew she needed an apostrophe in the first sentence, but couldn’t figure out where? Or that she’s a little skimpy when it comes to her hyphen usage?

bingbing fin 0

(Omitting the hyphens in an age is one of the top 3 hyphen errors you’ll find on Yahoo!.)

I really think that if you’re going to write about finance and business for adults, you need to know the difference between a product (oh, like, say a Barbie doll) and a manufacturer (like Mantel). I’m pretty sure that even though Barbie is a pretty smart, yet plastic cookie, she did not release a doll:

barbie released doll fin

Perhaps to prove that she is completely uninterested in the correct use of punctuation, the writer throws in some random and thoroughly incorrect commas. But I’ll admit to one positive note: The writer has got me interested in seeing those ads where the Chinese actress stares, presumably at the camera:

stared commas fin

 

Dumbest Punctuation of the Day

I have nothing to say about this creative, but truly ridiculous, use of the apostrophe on Yahoo! Style:

saint laurent sty

OK, I guess I did have something to say about it.

A couple is singular

A couple may consist of two people, but as a noun, it’s singular. Forget you saw this misplaced apostrophe on yahoo.com, which implies that there was more than one couple but only two people:

fp couples apos

Not discreetly placed

This hyphen from Yahoo! Style is not discreetly placed; it’s as clear as day:

discretely-placed sty

If you care about writing that is scrupulously correct, you wouldn’t put a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word that follows it. If you care about being understood and not looking like an undereducated dilettante, you’d use discreet when you’re referring to something that was designed to attract little attention.

Reverse that!

The writer for Yahoo! Style should consider reversing her knowledge of apostrophes: Wherever she thinks she needs one, she should omit it. And wherever she omitted an apostrophe, she should add one:

stores no apos sty

Lo and behold, an apostrophe!

Lo and behold! For some reason the writer for Yahoo! Finance gives us a little apostrophe:

lo apos fin

Perhaps she thinks lo is a contraction of some word like lox or lob. It isn’t. It’s an interjection used to express surprise or to call attention and often appears in the idiom lo and behold.

Did you draw a blank?

Did the writer for Yahoo! Makers draw a blank when trying to write about that thing in a bureau that slides in and out and that is used for storage?

draw diy

It’s called a drawer. If you’re from Boston, like me, you may pronounce it draw, but you spell it with that -ER at the end. But that’s the least of this writer’s problems. She just doesn’t know how to form the plural of a noun, insisting on including an apostrophe:

draw kitchens apost diy

She makes a common, everyday mistake with this spelling:

draw everyday

It wouldn’t surprise me if she spelled it that way every day, ’cause here it is again:

draw everyday 2

If the first one is a typo, then the second one is a misspelling. But I’ll concede that this is a typo that even a spell-checker wouldn’t spot (but a competent editor would):

draw if

Here’s a creative spelling of bathroom and a mysterious sparklingly where sparkling would do:

draw bath room

How many more mistakes can one writer make in one article? At least one more, although this may constitute two:

draw like was

I’m not sure what that’s supposed to mean. I wish Yahoo had writers who could write and editors who could edit; it makes life way easier for readers.

Let’s be honest

Let’s be honest: This Yahoo! Style writer has no idea that let’s is a contraction of let us and requires an apostrophe:

lets be honest sty

She also doesn’t realize that eleven years is not a wait, but a length of time, which might be a long time to wait for something. Maybe she thought eleven years is a long time to wait for an education, and dropped out of high school. Maybe if she had stayed in school she would have learned a little grammar, like matching a pronoun with its antecedent.

One day’s worth of errors

I couldn’t possibly address one day’s worth of errors found on the Yahoo! front page. I couldn’t handle just two hours’ worth of typos. There are just too many mistakes on Yahoo!, including this missing apostrophe:

fp 33 years worth

I’m not sure what “33 years’ worth of taxes” is. I guess it’s the same as “33 years of tax returns.” Anyhoo, the writer omitted the apostrophe in what the Associated Press calls a quasi possessive. Other similar constructions that you’re likely to encounter:

  • two weeks’ vacation
  • three years’ experience
  • his money’s worth

If it ends in S, add an apostrophe

It seems to be the punctuation philosophy at Yahoo! Makers: If a word ends in an S, add an apostrophe:

gets apos diy hp

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