Marvel’s first superhero squad

I know nothing of superheros — Marvel or otherwise. What I do know:  This writer for Yahoo! Movies knows nothing of premiere (which is the first showing or debut) and premier (which means most important, chief, or principal and the word she should have used):

premiere mov

How much rent did he collect?

I wonder how much money a landlord collects from “core tenants.”

tenants mov

Maybe I’ll ask the writer for Yahoo! Movies. I’m sure she’ll know because one of the core tenets of Yahoo! writers is “know thy subject.” Ha-ha! Sometimes I crack myself up!

Think readers don’t notice typos?

I read this headline on Yahoo! Movies and thought it was about either Heath Ledger or a moor in Scotland:

heathy mov

Seriously, we know it’s “just” a typo, but if you think that typos and misspellings don’t matter, take a look at these comments made by Yahoo! readers:

“Seriously, ‘Heathy Dose’ as a tag line? I’ve watched the horrible editing at Yahoo for years, but this is ridiculous. The small squiggly line in your editor means it’s spelled incorrectly, you morons. I’d even understand if you’d made some Ledger-Batman reference, but you’re just horrible. Oprah needs people at The O, at least move on. Christ, get a quote right.”

“You guys misspelled your freakin title to this article. Really? Heathy? I’m assuming you meant Healthy. I mean if you want to be taken as a serious journalist then at least proof read you own article before you send it out. I’m sure they must teach that somewhere in 9th grade.”

“Jesus yahoo. You could at least spell your headlines correctly.”

“This is what happens when Yahoo hires writers who had to take remedial English. It’s just not a heathy work ethic.”

“Sorry, what’s a “heathy” dose of violence? Well done Yahoo!”

“A “Heathy” dose of violence?? Does anyone proofread the hook line??”

In addition to also

In addition to using in addition to, the writer for Yahoo! Movies used the redundant also:

whose guided mov

Who’s responsible for the use of whose instead of who’s? The writer, who’s actually a senior editor. He’s also responsible for the missing parenthesis and the totally mystifying ending to that paragraph.

Meryl Streep rock outs

Meryl Streep did something called “rock outs” according to the Yahoo! Movies:

rock outs mov

Personally, I’d prefer it if Meryl Streep rocks out, but that’s just me.

What What are you really saying?

Forget about what R2-D2 is saying. I want to know what this headline on Yahoo! Movies is really saying:

what what mov

To me it says, “We don’t proofread because we are Yahoo.”

Meow we’re misspelling

Here’s what looks like a simple typo on Yahoo! Movies, although I can’t always tell the difference between a typo and a misspelling:

lauches mov

Fifty shades of Grey? Is that your question?

No, no, no. Somehow writers and editors at Yahoo! got the idea that terminating punctuation always goes before a closing quotation mark. To prove my assertion (as if one more example is proof), here’s a headline from Yahoo! Movies:

grey apos ques mov

In the U.S., commas and periods go before the closing quote mark. Colons and semicolons go after the quote mark. But exclamation marks and question marks can go before or after the quotation mark, depending on meaning. A question mark goes before the closing quote mark only if the words within the quotation marks are an actual question. That means that the writer thinks “Fifty shades of Grey” is the question. It is not.

Someone needs to chastise that writer

Someone needs to chastise the writer of this headline on Yahoo! Movies for the serious misspelling:

chastizes movies

Is that your question?

If the question in this headline on Yahoo! Movies is “Secretary?” then this punctuation is correct:

secretary quest quot movies

But, of course, the whole sentence is the question, so the question mark belongs after the closing quotation mark.

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