Someone needs to chastise that writer

Someone needs to chastise the writer of this headline on Yahoo! Movies for the serious misspelling:

chastizes movies

Is that your question?

If the question in this headline on Yahoo! Movies is “Secretary?” then this punctuation is correct:

secretary quest quot movies

But, of course, the whole sentence is the question, so the question mark belongs after the closing quotation mark.

Blogger bests cocky headline writer

OK, I’m just guessin’ here, but I think the headline writer for Yahoo! Movies meant “Gaston Bests Cocky Kid,” meaning Gaston beat the kid at a pushup contest:

beasts

I’d prefer more ado

Without further ado (or any ado for that matter), let me present a homophonic horror from Yahoo! Movies:

adieu movies

I wish we could finally bid adieu to this mistake, but I fear the folks at Yahoo! will never learn the difference between a word that means farewell (that’d be adieu) and one that means a fuss (ado).

All those errors remind us of fourth grade

There are more errors committed by professional writers and editors on Yahoo! than in all the high school newspapers in the country. All those errors — including this one from Yahoo! Movies — remind me of my fourth grade class when we learned to spot the subject of a sentence and then match the verb to it:

reminds us movies

I guess this writer was sick that day.

Coming up with ‘coming up’

How did the writer for Yahoo! Movies come up with this expression?

coming up the pipe movies

The idiom was originally “coming down the pike” although you’ll also hear (and read) “coming down the pipe.” But no one (except our esteemed Yahoo! scribe) would come up with “coming up the pipe.”

What do Matthew McConaughey and J.R.R. Tolkien have in common?

What could Matthew McConaughey possibly have in common with J.R.R. Tolkien? They both appeared on the home page of Yahoo! Movies. And they’ve both had their name misspelled there:

mcconauhgey movies

 

tolkein movies

Here’s a tip for Yahoo!’s writers: You should always, always verify the spelling of every name you pound out. Simply highlight the name, right-click, and choose “Search Google for …” See how easy that is. There really is no excuse for making mistakes like these.

I almost dozed off reading this

If the sleep aid for geeks involves a dose of Ambien, then maybe they’ll be dozing off sooner rather than later. Perhaps that’s what the writer for Yahoo! Movies took just before writing this:

dosing movies

Oooh, nice figure you got there, Kate

What kind of compliment would a “high waist and color blocking” pay to Kate Winslet’s figure? That’s the question we all want answered after reading this on Yahoo! Movies:

compliment celeb

When you say something nice, you compliment a person. When two things go well together, they complement each other.

Capital crimes

It should be a crime (or at least a misdemeanor), to capitalize a word needlessly. You wouldn’t capitalize the word writer, would you? So why would anyone capitalize the word director, when it is simply an occupation or job, and not an official title? Oh, yeah, I almost forgot: This is yahoo.com and normal rules of language do not apply:

fp director uc

The writer probably thought it was really special, just as the writer for Yahoo! Travel thought that mecca was really deserving of a capital letter:

mecca cap travel

Sometimes, it does get an uppercase M — when it refers to the city in Saudi Arabia. But if the reference is to a place that is visited by many people, then it’s just a mecca.

Some people love autumn so much they bestow a capital letter on fall. That’s especially true over at Yahoo! Style, where the writers seem to think that style refers to making up your own rules about English:

fall cap style

And here:

fall uc style

And here:

fall cap style 2

And spring has sprung into a proper noun in the mind of at least one writer:

spring uc style

Not to be left out of the Society to Elevate Seasons to Proper Nouns, a writer for Yahoo! Movies decides that if fall gets a cap, so does autumn:

autumn cap movies

Capital crimes? Maybe not, but I’m willing to make a citizen’s arrest and take the case (lowercase, of course), to court.

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