Repeated redundancy

Well, do you think that the editor for Yahoo Style knows what palatial means? I think not, otherwise we wouldn’t be subjected to this headline:

Readers of Style noticed the redundancy, too, and didn’t hesitate to point it out:

Did you really just write “palatial palaces”? Do you work for the Department of Redundancy Department?

all palaces are palatial, dummy. It’s the definition of a palace. It’s like spatious [sic] space.
“Palatial Palaces”? Isn’t that redundantly redundant?
Can we talk about how the headline says “palatial palaces”? I find this an alarmingly alarming grammatical alarum.
Palatial palaces? What an uncultured illiterate!
Palatial: “resembling a palace” … Thus, a palatial palace = resembling a palace palace. I take it that Maggie Parker did not graduate from a top notch journalism school.
Palatial palaces? Seriously? That’s what you’re going to go with for your headline?
This article is redundant starting from the title…
A palatial palace? Um, palatial means “like a palace”. So, a palace-like palace? As opposed to….?
Palatial palaces? So…like…palace-like palaces? Redundancy is redundant
So, if you think readers don’t care about your use of words, think again and ponder once more. They notice.
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Because today’s meeting tomorrow is too late

Today’s Alibaba meeting kicked off today, according to Yahoo! Finance:

today-fin-hp

Makes sense to me. Who’d want to kick off today’s meeting tomorrow?

Is that the automated teller machine machine?

Let’s overlook this awkwardly worded sentence from Yahoo! Finance and focus on one of my pet peeves: ATM machines. No, not the machines themselves, but this phrase:

atm machine fin

The initialism ATM is short for “automated (or automatic) teller machine.” The addition of machine is superfluous and just drives me crazy. So do PIN number, MLB baseball, and VIN number.

Take that from from there

Someone at yahoo.com needs to learn to proofread. If they did, they’d take this from from this teaser:

fp from from

Editing you can DIY yourself

Here’s one headline on the Yahoo! front page that you can edit yourself:

fp yourself

Since DIY stands for “do it yourself,” this headline is a tad repetitious. It’s right up there in the Department of Redundancy Department with ATM machine and PIN number.

Even too much

The proofreading at yahoo.com was so weak that even even an extra word got through:

fp even even

Two seconds is too much

The eagle-eyed editors at the Yahoo! home page need to remove the second seconds and keep the first seconds, or remove the first seconds and keep the second seconds:

fp seconds

This magazine wants you to read its magazine

Maxim is a magazine. The writer for Yahoo! Style seems to have forgotten that. She thinks Maxim (when it’s in italics) is the company that publishes the magazine and that you can refer to a company by a plural pronoun. She’s wrong on both counts:

their magazine sty

She needs an editor to take the reins and correct her word usage. An editor who’ll remove coverups from a list of swimsuits since it’s not an actual swimsuit. An editor who’ll remove a galloping case of redundancy and who’ll make sense of this final sentence:

swimsuits sty

In addition to also

In addition to using in addition to, the writer for Yahoo! Movies used the redundant also:

whose guided mov

Who’s responsible for the use of whose instead of who’s? The writer, who’s actually a senior editor. He’s also responsible for the missing parenthesis and the totally mystifying ending to that paragraph.

How’s that proofreading going? How’s that proofreading going?

It’s not uncommon to see mistakes on Yahoo! DIY. It’s not uncommon to see mistakes on Yahoo! DIY. Like repeated sentences. Like repeated sentences. And sentences that never get an end because the writer nodded off. And sentences that never get an end because the writer nodded off.

ind wed diy

Kinda illustrates the need for proofreading, doesn’t it?

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