Whose mistake is it?

Who’s responsible for this homophonic error on Yahoo! Beauty? Whose mistake is it?

whos breed bea

Who doesn’t know that who’s is a contraction of who is or who has. The writer and editor.

Did anyone hear her signing?

I just don’t understand the controversy that was recently covered by Yahoo! Sports. How many people could actually hear a woman signing the national anthem? I thought signing was a way to communicate with people who are hearing-challenged and therefore didn’t involve sounds:

signing mlb

This looks a lot like a sentence

This looks a lot like a sentence on the Yahoo! front page. It just doesn’t make a lot of sense, what with the missing word or words:

fp sounds a lot

Eek! An error!

Eek! Two errors compound this homophonic goof on Yahoo! Sports:

eek mlb

The expression is eke out, not eek out, not eke out of, and definitely not eek out of. The word eek is what cartoon characters (and apparently women in the 1970s) say when they see a mouse:

eek a mouse

Josh Hamilton: A man for our season

Josh Hamilton is ours for the season. I think. Or maybe he’s out for the season. I think. What do you think this headline from Yahoo! Sports really means?

our for season spo

Prom? Is that your question?

It’s a short question, and it may mean something to a Yahoo! Style reader, but to me it’s nonsense:

prom ques sty hp

Prom? That’s the question? Uh, no. The question is: Are these kids too young to be dressing up for ‘prom’? The entire headline is a question, not just the word in the quotation marks.

It doesn’t take a genius

You don’t have to be a genius to know how to spell homogeneous. And if you can’t spell it (like the editors at yahoo.com), perhaps you could ask your employer for one of those newfangled thingies called a spell-checker. I hear they work quite well.

fp homogenous

Neither is singular

The writer and editor for Yahoo! Sports gave this sentence the thumbs-up. But neither was correct:

neither have been mlb

As a pronoun, neither is singular.

Did you really mean to write did?

I’m fatally unhip and tragically pop-culturally challenged, so maybe I’m wrong. Maybe this headline on the home page of Yahoo! Beauty isn’t a sign of the apocalypse; maybe it’s just a sign of current slang:

nails did bea

The problem? If you’re going to use slang and you don’t want to look like a moron, grammatically speaking, you need to have established a reputation for publishing perfect prose, free of misspellings, grammatical gaffes, and punctuation problems. Then, when you choose to write incorrectly for comedic or dramatic effect, your readers get it. But if you write for Yahoo!, where hundreds of mistakes are made every day, don’t use slang. You’ll look as ignorant as this writer.

Written by a millennial?

If you saw this misspelling onYahoo! Beauty, would you assume it was written by a millennial?

millenials beau

A survey conducted in August 2015 found that “74% of Americans ages 18 to 34 are annoyed by grammar and spelling mistakes on social media,” according to the Los Angeles Times.

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