Series of errors is common

A series of errors on the Yahoo! front page is not unusual. It’s quite common to see a mismatch of a subject (like series) and its verb (which should be aims):

fp series aim

The noun series is both singular and plural. In this case, it’s used as a singular noun because there’s only one series of ads.

Gambling on it

I’ll bet anyone dollars to donuts that the editors for the Yahoo! front page have no idea what an antecedent is and why a pronoun must agree with it:

fp gambling on it

An antecedent is the noun that a pronoun refers to. The pronoun must agree with its antecedent, meaning that they both must be the same number (singular or plural). A plural noun (like oh, say, maybe fights) requires a plural pronoun (like them).

A crushed spirit

A crushed spirit at Yahoo! Sports might have gone unnoticed if it wasn’t in a headline:

sprit spo

A feasible explanation

I’d like an explanation from the folks at yahoo.com how expensive rents make homeownership more feasible:

fp more feasible

Perhaps the writers, who likely work in a non-English-speaking country, think that feasible means “attractive” and not “possible.” That would be a feasible explanation.

Tiiter, tiiter, this isn’t Twitter

This isn’t Twitter on the Yahoo! front page:

fp twiiter

Speak English

One of these days, this writer for Yahoo! Style will break into English, using correct verbs and prepositions. But today is not that day:

speak into sty

What no one tells you

Here’s something no one tells the writers and editors at yahoo.com: You’re missing a word.

fp what no tells

War on Buffett

Is yahoo.com waging a war on Warren Buffett by deliberately misspelling his name?

fp buffet

That’s not a typo when you do it twice. And what’s with that blank space in the bottom left?

In the unlikely event you use the right word…

In the unlikely event the writer for Yahoo! Answers stumbles on the correct word, I’d be flabbergasted:

on the event ans

Illiterate in two languages

The writers at Yahoo! Makers aren’t known for their mastery of the English language. Now we can bestow another honor: Illiterate in French:

bon appetite diy

The expression in French is bon appétit!

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