According to my research

According to my research, it’s not acquiring more readers that makes bloggers happier, it’s writing grammatically correct sentences. If that’s true, the Yahoo! Beauty writer responsible for this subject-verb mismatch can’t be too happy:

Neither the writer nor the editor was correct

Neither the writer nor the editor at Yahoo! Style was correct when they accepted this verb choice:

When a compound subject is joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb must agree with the noun closer to it. That noun, groom, is singular and the verb should be was, not were.

This appears to be wrong

One reader’s confidence in Yahoo! News appears to be shaken when the editors can’t match a singular subject (confidence) with the correct verb:

Neither or nor have is correct

From Yahoo! Celebrity, two gaffes for the price of one:

Neither or nor the verb have responded is correct. The partner of neither is nor, not or. And when a compound subject is joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb must agree with the subject closer to it. So, the verb should be has responded.

How many pilots?

When a typo appears on Yahoo! News (at least I hope it’s just a typo), it can leave me scratching my head:

After dusting the dandruff off my keyboard, I have to ask: How many pilots were doin’ the asking? One pilot asks passengers to pray? Or two or more pilots ask passengers to pray?

I’m praying for an answer.

More thought, time and energy might help

The thought, time and energy that go into editing have not increased exponentially on Yahoo! Sports:

More thought, time and energy might have led to correcting the mismatched plural subject and singular verbs.

Incidents like these

Incidents of mismatched subjects and verbs are unfortunately common on Yahoo! Style:

Neither is correct

The writer and editor at Yahoo! Style — neither of whom is a grammatical genius — thought this was correct:

In general neither, used as a pronoun, is grammatically singular and takes a singular verb like is, not are.  Some experts are OK with neither taking a plural verb when it is followed by of and a plural, like: Neither of us know much about grammar.

The dream and reality of two different things

The dream of a grammatically correct sentence and the reality of writing at Yahoo! Finance continue to be at odds:

Are you being series?

Is the writer for Yahoo! Style being serious? Did she really think this paragraph was ready for the big time?

Didn’t she notice that the title of the book is “Debutante Divorcée”? How are we supposed to interpret “big hair sprayed hair”? I’ll guess it’s supposed to be “big hair, sprayed hair.” Or maybe  “big hairsprayed hair.” But I have no firsthand (Note: It’s one word) knowledge of that.

I also have no firsthand knowledge of the writer’s reasoning for using need instead of the correct needs. Or for using both but and yet together. Is she being serious?

%d bloggers like this: