I’m just cury-ous

I’m cury-ous: How does a mistake like this on Yahoo! Style get past the editor and the spell-checker?

Illiterate in two languages

When the editors at Yahoo! Style aren’t mangling the English language, they’re destroying French, or now-English phrases derived from French. Like this:

I can only assume the editors meant prêt-à-porter, which means “ready-to-wear,” and is a widely understood term in fashion. Except at Yahoo!.

Big Bird, Cookie Monster, and manmade errors

Maybe the writer for Yahoo! Style is dealing with a funky keyboard with an occasionally inoperable Shift key and a space bar that’s kinda jacked:

Just in case the writer actually made these mistakes intentionally, let’s school her: Big Bird and Cookie Monster are Muppets deserving of being treated as proper nouns. And manmade is one word according to the American Heritage Dictionary, though it allows the hyphenated man-made.

Do you mean Christmas songs?

Something’s amiss over at Yahoo! Style, and I’m pretty sure it has to do with a misspelling:

Did the writer mean carols? Or maybe carrots? I just don’t know. Think I’ll head to the library, grab a dictionary and settle into a carrel. Maybe I’ll find the answer there.

Welcome. Now go away

The home page of a website is like a welcome mat. But what if that mat read “Welkome”? Would you still enter the site?

Would you click on this headline on Yahoo! Style’s home page, knowing that Amber Valletta spells her name with two L’s?

valetta-sty-hp

Would you trust that site if it can’t get close to correctly spelling LuLaRoe?

luluaroe-sty-hp

How many errors does it take before you realize maybe you’re really not welcome?

Not a serious attempt at Pharrell

It’s on honor to be on the front page of Yahoo! Style, unless they do this to your name:

pharells-sty-hp

That was an editor’s attempt at spelling  Pharrell, which is the first half of Pharrell Williams. You’d think the folks in charge would make a serious attempt at spelling the star’s name right. Instead, they just made a serious error.

Readers protest tyop

Readers protest this attempt at ageism on Yahoo! Style:

agesim-sty-fp

Maybe a pick-me-up would give it some oomph

This little excerpt from Yahoo! Style could use a little oomph. A pick-me-up and some hyphens are in order:

umph-sty

The writer could probably use a little pick-me-up too, or at least a little pick-me-up-and-take-me-to-a-dictionary. There she might learn that umph, when it does appear in a dictionary, is an expression of disgust or skepticism.

You know the old saying?

You know the old saying “it’s better to write fast than to write well”? No? That’s because I made it up after reading this on Yahoo! Style:

sleeves-sweater

I’m trying to come up with a reason for so many errors, like the missing punctuation in what should be ’70s, and the use of its for the  contraction it’s. And more missing punctuation and the misspelling of granddad. And why the writer would call this sweater a “sleeves sweater”:

sleeveless

It’s a sleeveless sweater or a vest or even a sweater vest.

But why so many errors? I can only surmise that the writer was under an incredible time crunch, that she’s not a great typist and that she hasn’t completely mastered English. And the company she works for has very, very low standards for content. Maybe even no standards.

Ronald Reagan, first female president

If you thought that Hillary Clinton would have been the first female president of the United States, you’re overlooking Ronald Reagan. Mr. Reagan, according to the genius Yahoo! Style writer, was a female who had been divorced:

divorcess-trump-sty

If he’d been a man, he would have been a divorcé.

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