Break out the eraser

Time to break out the eraser and correct this from Yahoo Lifestyle:

When it’s one word, breakout is a noun or adjective. The phrasal verb is two words: break out.

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According to dictionaries…

According to dictionaries, Yahoo News editors can’t spell meteorologists:

Change the Y to I

Didn’t we all learn this in third grade: To form the plural of a word ending in a consonant and Y, change the Y to I and add ES. No, we didn’t. At least the writer and editor for Yahoo Lifestyle didn’t learn that:

Not only did they miss it, their spell-checker missed it, too. Unless they don’t actually have a spell-checker.

Not a good place for that

The home page of Yahoo News is not a good place for a typo — especially in a headline:

That Shrkeli fella is actually Martin Shkreli.

Readers perplexed by word

Readers of Yahoo! Style were extremely perplexed by this word on the site’s home page:

Is it possible that Yahoo! Style doesn’t have a spell-checker? Or proofreaders? Or editors? You’d think that one of those would have spotted this misspelling.

To kick off this post

To kick off this blog post about Yahoo! Style, I’m excited to share that neither the writer nor the editor knows the difference between a noun (like kickoff) and a phrasal verb (like kick off):

What do you call getting nauseated in a museum?

Sick at a museum? You may be suffering from ad nauseum! Sick of seeing misspellings on Yahoo! Style? Me, too. They seem to occur ad nauseam:

Who do you trust?

Would you consider Yahoo! News a trustworthy source of information if the editors either don’t proofread or can’t spot an obvious typo in a headline?

The word they were going for is affluenza, a blend of affluence and influenza, which joined the pop culture lexicon in 2013 when it was used in the defense of an obnoxious teen charged with four counts of intoxication manslaughter.

I hate to be a tattletale…

… but the editors at Yahoo! Sports broke up a perfectly good word:

This doesn’t pass the smell test

If only there were a way for the Yahoo! Style writer to verify the spelling of the captions she writes. Maybe if she had a picture of the eau de parfum she’s writing about, she wouldn’t make these misspellings:

Oh, wait! Here’s the actual picture that goes with that caption:

Maybe she didn’t think she needed to look at it. But when writing this caption:

. . . don’t you think she should have checked out the picture of the bottle of eau de parfum, which is quite different from cologne and eau de cologne:

Well, she finally got the product right in this caption:

. . .  but not the name of the manufacturer:

If these captions didn’t appear right next to the product pictures, perhaps no one would have noticed that the writer can’t copy words right under her nose. But they’re there and there’s no amount of eau de parfum that can cover the stink.

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