Break out the eraser

Time to break out the eraser and correct this from Yahoo Lifestyle:

When it’s one word, breakout is a noun or adjective. The phrasal verb is two words: break out.

Advertisements

According to dictionaries…

According to dictionaries, Yahoo News editors can’t spell meteorologists:

Change the Y to I

Didn’t we all learn this in third grade: To form the plural of a word ending in a consonant and Y, change the Y to I and add ES. No, we didn’t. At least the writer and editor for Yahoo Lifestyle didn’t learn that:

Not only did they miss it, their spell-checker missed it, too. Unless they don’t actually have a spell-checker.

What editors got wrong on Yahoo News

Maybe it’s just a typo to the editors at Yahoo News, but to the readers it’s a red flag:

Can you trust a source that doesn’t require proofreading on its home page and that doesn’t even use a spell-checker?

Not a good place for that

The home page of Yahoo News is not a good place for a typo — especially in a headline:

That Shrkeli fella is actually Martin Shkreli.

Ability to count optional

You don’t need to be able to count to write for Yahoo Finance:

This writer can’t count and can’t get the name of the retirement account right: It’s 401(k). So, why would anyone trust the advice from this site?

Did the editor roll over?

Was there some disagreement at Yahoo Finance about the name of a popular retirement plan? Did the writer insist it’s a 401k, but the editor claim it’s 401(k)? Did the editor roll over and write this:

Well, a finance writer and editor who don’t know that the plan is a 401(k) probably don’t know that rollover isn’t a verb. The verb phrase is two words: roll over. (And the illustrator has a different idea about the plan’s name.)

But wait! There’s more! The headline for the article also claims rollover can be a verb. (What would its past tense be? rollovered?)

And there’s yet another (and wrong) name for the plan, this time with a capital K. (I’m going to overlook the missing hyphen in what normally would be two-minute.  It’s Yahoo’s feature and the company can call it anything it wants, even if it’s slightly illiterate.)

Readers perplexed by word

Readers of Yahoo! Style were extremely perplexed by this word on the site’s home page:

Is it possible that Yahoo! Style doesn’t have a spell-checker? Or proofreaders? Or editors? You’d think that one of those would have spotted this misspelling.

Taking a gamble

Taking a gamble that they know how to spell Procter in Procter and Gamble, the editors at Yahoo! News lose:

It’s not a real doppelganger

This may look like a doppelganger of doppelganger on Yahoo! Style, but it’s not:

Is there anything more embarrassing than misspelling a word in a headline?

%d bloggers like this: