Do you work for the same company?

Editors at Yahoo News seem to be unfamiliar with sports writer Ben Rohrbach — or at least how to spell his name:

That’s a little odd. Not just because it’s so easy to verify the spelling of a name (what with the Internet and all), but because Ben Rohrbach is a writer for “Big League Stew,” a column for Yahoo Sports:

You’d think the editors would know better or would at least try to avoid embarrassing themselves in front of millions of readers.

Advertisements

Ya’ll laugh

Y’all take a look at this headline; y’all be embarrassed for the yahoo.com editor:

The Southern express y’all is a colloquial contraction of you and all. The misplaced apostrophe in ya’ll makes that a contraction of ya (or you) and will. Y’all got that?

Just stopped by to say “hi”

Hi! That’s the word from Yahoo News:

I’d say that Yahoo’s image as a news source takes a hit with that headline.

Forth what it’s Worth . . .

This is probably a common typo involving the Texas city of Fort Worth. But the fact that it appears on one of the most visited pages on the Internet — yahoo.com — makes it a real embarrassment:

Why? Fie!

Why did the editors at Yahoo News think this was OK? It’s not.

The Wi-Fi Alliance owns the trademark for Wi-Fi, which has a hyphen and two capital letters. It’s like Crock-Pot, another registered trademark that Yahoo staffers often mistreat.

Pleading or pledging

Readers could be pleading with the editors at Yahoo Lifestyle to employ a proofreader, or at least a spell-checker:

Fake news!

There’s something fishy on the home page of Yahoo News:

I can’t figure out if it was the Tuscan police who released footage or the Tucson police. Judging from the fact that the incident occurred in Arizona, I’m going with the latter.

A hairy problem

Why on God’s green earth did the Yahoo Lifestyle writer think this is correct?

I think she was going for hairdo, and became a tad confused. The contraction ‘do is often used on Yahoo in place of hairdo. The apostrophe is supposed to indicate that there are letters missing, so the writer was really describing a hair hairdo. But according to the American Heritage dictionary, do (sans apostrophe) is correct and hairdo is one word.

 

This is infuriating

This is infuriating. At least I think that’s the word the Yahoo News editor meant to use:

I don’t know if Ellen DeGeneres is infuriated, too, by the fact that the editor or writer can’t quite get her name right.

Feeling the stress

It must have been a stressful weekend over at the editor’s desk at yahoo.com. Maybe that’s why the editors missed the missing apostrophe here:

Or failed to recognize that schoolyard is one word:

Someone should demand to know why a typo like this slipped through the spell-checker:

(Oh, yeah. I forgot. Yahoo editors don’t use spell-checkers. Or proofreaders.)

No spell-checker would have caught this perfectly spelled bit of nonsense:

I have no idea what that was supposed to be. Can anyone translate it for me?

%d bloggers like this: