Here’s a wise word of wisdom for ya’

Here’s a word of wisdom for the Yahoo! Style editor: Consult a dictionary about the meaning of the words you use. Perhaps then you’d learn that “wise words” are the only kind that come with wisdom:

wise-wisdom-sty-hp

You couldn’t have just said “wise words” or “words of wisdom” or just “wisdom”? Apparently not.

And here’s another bit of wisdom for ya’: Take some pride in your writing and try to spell the name of your subject correctly. She’s Lea Michele. Spelling her name wrong is worse than “wise words of wisdom.”

Ladies first

I guess elementary schools don’t teach the same things nowadays that they did when I was a youngster. Of course, that was many, many decades ago, but I thought there were some subjects that were eternal. Like how to form the plural of nouns. Judging from this excerpt from Yahoo! Style, schools are neglecting that bit of knowledge — or the writer was playing hooky that day:

ladies-room-sty

The possessive plural of lady is ladies’. It follows a simple rule: Form the plural of the noun and if it ends in S, add an apostrophe. So, it’s idiots’ and dummies’. If the plural doesn’t end in S, add an apostrophe and S: So women’s, children’s, and alumni’s are correct.

That’s altogether different

This Yahoo! Style writer should get a jump-start on her high school diploma and head over to a dictionary. She might learn that jump-start has a hyphen, workout is one word when it’s a noun and this sentence is altogether different from correct:

jumpstart-work-out-altogether-sty

Let’s say this all together: If you mean “totally, entirely, completely,” use altogether. Use all together when you mean “together, as a unit or whole.”

An embarrassing wardrobe malfunction

Here’s a really embarrassing wardrobe malfunction, courtesy of Yahoo! Style:

wardobe-sty-hp

How one dreadful headline led to a headache

Oy. Does my head ache! And I blame it on this headline from Yahoo! Movies:

lead-4-led-cel

It led to my throbbing temples. What made the editor think that lead was the past tense of lead? When lead is pronounced led, it’s the stuff that’s in a pencil. The past tense of the verb lead (which is pronounced leed) is led. Which leads me to another source of my pain: That crazy hyphen before Detour. What led the editor to believe that was correct?

Someone should get a long sentence for that Clause

It’s off to the grammar slammer for the Yahoo! Celebrity writer responsible for this clumsy Clause:

santa-clause-sty

The bigger the package…

Well. This is generally a G-rated blog, but sometimes Yahoo! staffers make R-rated mistakes. This time the Yahoo! Style makes this claim:

prics-sty

Could be. The bigger the package, the bigger the pric. Not that I’m speaking from experience., but I hear many people saying that.

Fashion not your passion?

If fashion isn’t your passion, maybe you shouldn’t be writing for Yahoo! Style. Or maybe it just doesn’t matter that you don’t know the real name of designer Nicolas Ghesquière:

nicholas-ghesquire-sty

So, you don’t care to spell his name correctly. No biggy. You might want to focus on grammar and using the correct tense instead. Or not.

Words with friends

Someone should have a word with this Yahoo! Style writer and suggest that perhaps she up her writing game. A real friend might suggest that she learn how to proofread, so that she doesn’t spell Scrabble like this:

face-lip

And then maybe someone could explain the importance of getting real facts. Scrabble isn’t the original “friends with words.”  It’s considered the original Words with Friends, which is an actual word game. The game didn’t get a face lip (which is where most lips are), it got a facelift. As for the rest of the sentence, a true friend wouldn’t bother to read it since it appears to be a bunch of random words.

Call me old-fashioned

Call me old-fashioned, but I think that professional writers, like those at Yahoo! Style, should use actual English words, spelled correctly:

old-fashion-sty

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