Illiterate in two languages

When the editors at Yahoo! Style aren’t mangling the English language, they’re destroying French, or now-English phrases derived from French. Like this:

I can only assume the editors meant prêt-à-porter, which means “ready-to-wear,” and is a widely understood term in fashion. Except at Yahoo!.

A screaming cape, a ladylike error, and sometimes grey

It’s probably not ladylike to point out writing errors by professional writers, but I’ve never been mistaken for a lady. When I saw three errors in a single sentence on Yahoo! Style, I knew I had to say something:

What did the writer think “a lady like pink” means? That there’s a lady who likes pink? Uh, no. She meant “a ladylike pink.” That’s something completely different. Also different is the spelling of grey. Although it’s not technically wrong, some U.S. authorities consider it a chiefly British spelling, and all suggest that gray is the preferred spelling.

That sound you hear is me screaming: Seeing mistakes like that makes me literally scream. But can a cape literally scream? No, but it can figuratively scream.

Do you mean Christmas songs?

Something’s amiss over at Yahoo! Style, and I’m pretty sure it has to do with a misspelling:

Did the writer mean carols? Or maybe carrots? I just don’t know. Think I’ll head to the library, grab a dictionary and settle into a carrel. Maybe I’ll find the answer there.

She’s still not a princess

Let’s skip right over that misspelling of a cappella on Yahoo! Style and focus on the misspelling of Charlotte Casiraghi’s name:

And then let’s focus on the assertion that she is an “actual Princess of Monaco.” No, even if the writer had managed to get her name right, she’d be wrong about that royal title. Charlotte Casiraghi may be eighth in line to the throne of Monaco, but she is not a princess; in fact, she has no royal title. None.

Welcome. Now go away

The home page of a website is like a welcome mat. But what if that mat read “Welkome”? Would you still enter the site?

Would you click on this headline on Yahoo! Style’s home page, knowing that Amber Valletta spells her name with two L’s?

valetta-sty-hp

Would you trust that site if it can’t get close to correctly spelling LuLaRoe?

luluaroe-sty-hp

How many errors does it take before you realize maybe you’re really not welcome?

Throw it back

There are so many things wrong with this paragraph from Yahoo! Style that if I were writer’s editor, I’d throw it back at her and say, “Try again, honey. It’s not worth my time to try to fix this.”

throw-back

Is it really that bad? Yes. Yes, it is. An editor could change the pronouns their and they to its and it, since they seem to refer to Milan. And an editor could add the word the before Milanese’s and change that to the plural possessive Milaneses’. But the sentence still wouldn’t make any sense. It’s a straight-up (notice the hyphen?) mess. It’s a throwback (notice it’s one word?) to the days of our youth, before we knew about grammar and spelling and punctuation and sentences with actual verbs.

But that’s not all. The Cure should be The Cure’s and the random capitalization of some of those song titles has me scratching my head and dusting the dandruff off my keyboard. And the noun throwback is still one word.

Not a serious attempt at Pharrell

It’s on honor to be on the front page of Yahoo! Style, unless they do this to your name:

pharells-sty-hp

That was an editor’s attempt at spelling  Pharrell, which is the first half of Pharrell Williams. You’d think the folks in charge would make a serious attempt at spelling the star’s name right. Instead, they just made a serious error.

Not even trying

There are times when I read something on Yahoo! Style and think, the writer isn’t even trying to be accurate. This is one of those times:

lisa-rena

The writer didn’t bother to do a little research into Lisa Rinna’s name. She couldn’t be bothered to find out the name of Ms. Rinna’s husband. Her husband is not Mark Hamlin; he’s Harry Hamlin. She’s just not tryin’.

Nailed it!

Nailed it? No, the editors at Yahoo! Style didn’t exactly nail the spelling of elegance:

eleganance-sty-hp

Now appearing Knightley

How bad is it when a professional writer screws up a celebrity’s first and last name? Pretty bad, but not surprising since the misspelling of Keira Knightley appears on Yahoo! Style:

kiera-knightly-sty

It’s not the only misspelling in the article, but what really made this one a standout was the fact that it could have been avoided with about 2 nanoseconds of effort. Oh, with another 2 nanoseconds of Googling, the writer might have learned that as a noun, standout is one word.

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