Today?s top typos

Today’s top two typos come to you from the home page of Yahoo! Style here:

sty hp weeks

and here:

sty hp insitute

and here:

daughers

and here’s another one!

instgrams

At least she got the color right

If you’ve been reading Terribly Write for a while, you know that the writers at Yahoo! Style are particularly challenged when it comes to issues such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling. So it’s no surprise that a writer thinks there should be a hyphen after an adverb ending in -LY and that she can’t spell anointed:

morning coat sty

When she’s not mangling the language, she’s mangling the facts. She claims Prince William wore a morning coat for his wedding. This is a morning coat:

morning

This is what Prince William actually wore:

morning coat

It is a military uniform and what we might call a jacket is referred to as a tunic. But I can see how one might confuse it with a morning coat because they both have two sleeves.

That’s an F for failure

If this photo caption from Yahoo! Style were written by a fourth grader, it’d get an F for a big fat failure:

show pre-nuptials sty

How the heck does this get published by one of the largest Internet companies in the world? The repeated word, the use of an apostrophe for an abbreviation, the misspelled launched and polka are all bad. Very bad. But the worst of these horrendous errors is the totally nonsensical, meaningless pile of words that ends the paragraph.

Dumbest Statement of the Day

Today’s Dumbest Statement comes to you via Yahoo! Style:

james francos progeny

There’s just so many things wrong with this photo caption that maybe it’s qualifies for the Dumbest Statements of the Day. Or the month.

There’s the creative use of an apostrophe in Mr. Franco’s name, as if his first name is Jame.

There’s the horrendous claim that Jack Kilmer is Mr. Franco’s offspring. (Here’s a little clue to the writer: a progeny is a descendant or offspring. That’s not the same as a prodigy, which is the word a literate person would use.)

Let’s not overlook the parenthetical statement that implies James Franco is a 19-year-old, who starred in his own film, “Palo Alto.”

Finally we learn that James Franco, the 19-year-old, is a fan of Val Kilmer’s son and Saint Laurent, which strikes me as a bit of a non sequitur. Perhaps both James Franco and Saint Laurent are fans of Mr. Kilmer’s son. Who is also Mr. Franco’s son.

I’m so confused.

This week’s worst punctuation error

OK, so maybe it’s not the worst punctuation error on Yahoo! Style. Maybe it’s just one of this week’s worst errors:

weeks best no apos

Suge? ‘Suge’? Who knows, who cares?

His name is Marion Hugh “Suge” Knight Jr., although he’s known as just Suge Knight on the Yahoo! front page:

fp suge 2

Someone disagrees (or more likely, has no idea what the other writer did), and decided that Mr. Knight’s nickname needed some quotation marks:

fp suge

Which is correct? Does it matter? Just pick one and go with it.

Is that correct? Not by a long shot

Is this idiom used correctly on Yahoo! Style? Not by a long shot. And by that I mean, “NO!” Jeez, doesn’t the writer know that a long shot is a horse, person, or occurrence that has little or no chance of succeeding?

long shot

This writer also is a long shot for succeeding at writing. If she’s not the worst writer at Yahoo!, she’s at least a runner-up.

Reader’s no-holds-barred reaction

Here’s my no-holds-barred reaction to this teaser on Yahoo! Celebrity: It sucks.

no-holds cel

It sucks, but it doesn’t suck as hard as this writer’s attempt at the common expression.

You might think so…

You might think that this misspelling of Freida Pinto’s name on Yahoo! Style was just a silly little typo:

frieda 1

You would be wrong. In the article behind that headline, we find the writer commits another “typo” as well as an idiotic idiomatic mistake with arrived to instead of arrived at:

frieda 2

And just in case you still want to give the writer the benefit of the doubt, let me remove all doubt. The writer really, really thinks this is how you spell Freida:

frieda 3

As for the punctuation, the placement of the comma may be OK in the UK, but in the States, commas and periods go before the closing quotation mark.

Idiom, idiot. They’re so close

Maybe the genius writer for Yahoo! Style made a little typo and was going for idiot when she wrote this:

idiom sty

Clearly she couldn’t have meant idiom because it’s not an idiom, it’s a saying, an adage, an old saw.

Now here’s an idiom (or it would be an idiom if the writer had gotten it right):

up to par with sty

The expression is “on a par with,” which means equal to. Or maybe it’s “up to par,” which means just average.

She would have been correct with close-ups — if she had just closed it up with a hyphen.

By “scratching on a century,” I think the writer means “approaching 100.” Maybe the writer doesn’t know that a century is 100 years and that at 86, the subject has 14 years before she’ll hit that milestone. That’s like saying a newborn is nearly a teenager or a 50-year-old is “scratching” on retirement.

Idiom, idiot. So close in spelling. And so close to being the correct word.

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