Just one person?

There’s just one American whose confidence in housing is on the rise, according to Yahoo! Finance:

americans apos fin

Hall of Fame error

If there were a Hall of Fame for hyphenation errors, this one on the Yahoo! front page would qualify for induction:

fp hall-of-famer 2

How many grooms were there?

If you read the story that accompanies these photo captions on Yahoo! Style (but really, why would you?) you’d learn that there was only one groom at this wedding. So, it looks like the writer had no idea where to put the apostrophe to show a possessive. It ain’t here:

grooms sty

and it ain’t here:

grooms sty 2

At least she was consistent, which is more than I can say when in comes to spelling the groom’s party attire — somehow it’s both bow ties and bowties.

To be honest…

To be honest (and why wouldn’t I be?), this has got to be the result of a very ignorant or very lazy Yahoo! Style writer:

honest and co sty 2

Jessica Alba is the founder of The Honest Company. Notice the lack of quotation marks (or are those apostrophes?) around the “company’s” name. Why would anyone put those marks around a company name? Because they work for Yahoo! and anything goes — right or wrong. But mostly wrong.

Take a 24-hour break

If you’re responsible for this headline on Yahoo! Style, step away from the keyboard and take a break — for about 24 hours. Then take a refresher course in the use of a hyphen:

24-hours sty

Hopefully to help

Huh? How do you helpfully build out a brand? What the heck did the writer for Yahoo! Style mean? Did she mean “to hopefully build” (meaning, to build with hope in one’s heart) or “to help build” (meaning, she can’t proofread)?

helpfully sty

At least she didn’t write runner-ups, but she did neglect to include the hyphen in what should be runners-up.

When I see expressions like “a piece” I have to wonder what the writer thinks that means. A piece of what? Did she perhaps mean each, in which case she should have used the word apiece.

Nice try, but wrong

The editors at yahoo.com made a valiant attempt to use the suspensive hyphen, but the result is really kinda pathetic:

fp mid-

The duchess is due in mid-April to late April. To avoid duplicating the word April, the writer tried using the suspensive hyphen after the prefix mid. Good job! But using a hyphen to join “to-late” makes no sense. But it’s too late to unsee that mistake. This should have been “mid- to late April.”

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” we see the results of a failure to agree on the title of a TV program:

fp x factor

Not a good day for Travel

I don’t often visit Yahoo! Travel. I had the impression that it was a well-written site that wouldn’t provide many examples of errors that would prove instructive to Terribly Write’s readers. Maybe today’s headlines are atypical, but they sure provide some great fodder for a blog post.

It looks like someone ripped off the hyphen in rip-offs, which needs it when it’s used as a noun:

rip offs tra

This isn’t a brand-new error; it’s a brand-new error. The hyphen is often missing from the adjective:

brand news tra

And my favorite is this headline about a restaurant called Warren where you have to carry your own tray and serve yourself macaroni and cheese and greasy fried chicken:

warren buffet tra

The Airbnb home was once the residence of Warren Buffett.

Can a movie reunite?

Can a movie reunite for a documentary? I can’t see how, yet that’s what it says on the Yahoo! front page:

fp bill and ted

Seems impossible, no? What’s more likely is that the characters Bill and Ted (without the quotation marks) are reuniting. With quotation marks, “Bill & Ted” is a shortened movie title.

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