Newly released hyphen use

I lied. This use of the hyphen on the Yahoo! front page is not new; in fact, this mistake happens every day on Yahoo!:

fp newly-released 2

There’s no reason to put a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word that it modifies. The suffix -LY is the signal to the reader that the adverb modifies the word that follows it.

My ‘aha’ moment

Reading this on Yahoo! Makers, I had an “aha” moment: This writer is in need of a competent editor and a course in English and writing:

a-ha diy

It wasn’t the incorrectly capitalized portobello; it wasn’t even the incorrectly hyphenated aha, although both indicate a careless writer unfamiliar with a basic dictionary. It was the dangling participle styling, which leads readers to believe that Mushroom Savanna did the styling of the fungi.

Lo and behold, an apostrophe!

Lo and behold! For some reason the writer for Yahoo! Finance gives us a little apostrophe:

lo apos fin

Perhaps she thinks lo is a contraction of some word like lox or lob. It isn’t. It’s an interjection used to express surprise or to call attention and often appears in the idiom lo and behold.

Will this produce reader pushback?

Readers of yahoo.com might consider a little pushback when it comes to the Internet giant’s policy of refusing to proofread or edit its content. Maybe then it would eliminate repeated words and arbitrary hyphens in words like pushback:

fp push-back 2

But is pushback, even if spelled correctly, the right word? Probably not. It means a resistance or opposition to something, like a policy, plan, or strategy. What Macy’s is doing competing with Amazon or responding to Amazon.

Readers all scream “Wrong!”

If you’re quoting people who are screaming, you probably want to punctuate the scream with an exclamation mark. And unlike the writer for Yahoo! Shopping, you probably know it belongs inside the quotation marks:

summer excl shop

Did you draw a blank?

Did the writer for Yahoo! Makers draw a blank when trying to write about that thing in a bureau that slides in and out and that is used for storage?

draw diy

It’s called a drawer. If you’re from Boston, like me, you may pronounce it draw, but you spell it with that -ER at the end. But that’s the least of this writer’s problems. She just doesn’t know how to form the plural of a noun, insisting on including an apostrophe:

draw kitchens apost diy

She makes a common, everyday mistake with this spelling:

draw everyday

It wouldn’t surprise me if she spelled it that way every day, ’cause here it is again:

draw everyday 2

If the first one is a typo, then the second one is a misspelling. But I’ll concede that this is a typo that even a spell-checker wouldn’t spot (but a competent editor would):

draw if

Here’s a creative spelling of bathroom and a mysterious sparklingly where sparkling would do:

draw bath room

How many more mistakes can one writer make in one article? At least one more, although this may constitute two:

draw like was

I’m not sure what that’s supposed to mean. I wish Yahoo had writers who could write and editors who could edit; it makes life way easier for readers.

Headline’s apostrophe goes missing

This headline’s apostrophe goes missing on Yahoo! Travel:

brides trav hp

Let’s be honest

Let’s be honest: This Yahoo! Style writer has no idea that let’s is a contraction of let us and requires an apostrophe:

lets be honest sty

She also doesn’t realize that eleven years is not a wait, but a length of time, which might be a long time to wait for something. Maybe she thought eleven years is a long time to wait for an education, and dropped out of high school. Maybe if she had stayed in school she would have learned a little grammar, like matching a pronoun with its antecedent.

Why is this so crucial?

Why is there a question mark at the end of this sentence on Yahoo! Makers? And how can a dimmer reduce overall energy output?

energy output

Great questions! The answers lie with a basic misunderstanding of English by the writer. The first has to do with a question embedded in a declarative sentence. The question is: Why is this so crucial? And some style experts would allow a question mark mid-sentence, like this: Why is this so crucial? you might ask. Looks weird to me. A better solution in my mind would be to recast the sentence: You might ask why this is so crucial.

On the second issue, the writer confused the word output with consumption or usage. At least, that’s my charitable view.

Is that Spanglish?

¡Ack! What language was this written in? Some hybrid of Spanish and English?

sweat ans

Maybe next time the writer for Yahoo! Answers attempts to write a sentence, he or she won’t feel it necessary to use an inverted exclamation mark and won’t fall asleep before completing that sentence.

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