In love with hyphens?

Has the writer for the Yahoo! front page just discovered the Hyphen key on a keyboard, and decided to use it — once too often?

fp hy

The hyphen after Jenner is correct. (Good job!) But there shouldn’t be a hyphen in the name because there’s no chance of a misunderstanding. Unless you’re writing about Olivia Newton-John or Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Then they get one hyphen each. But just one.

If you don;t like this…

If you don’t like the use of a semicolon to form a contraction, you won’t like this caption from Yahoo! Makers. But it doesn’t stop there: Your eyes aren’t deceiving you, the writer (who happens to be the site’s editor in chief) doesn’t know the difference between you’re and your and she omitted the hyphen in the compound adjective store-bought:

dont like youre diy

Hall of Fame error

If there were a Hall of Fame for hyphenation errors, this one on the Yahoo! front page would qualify for induction:

fp hall-of-famer 2

To be honest…

To be honest (and why wouldn’t I be?), this has got to be the result of a very ignorant or very lazy Yahoo! Style writer:

honest and co sty 2

Jessica Alba is the founder of The Honest Company. Notice the lack of quotation marks (or are those apostrophes?) around the “company’s” name. Why would anyone put those marks around a company name? Because they work for Yahoo! and anything goes — right or wrong. But mostly wrong.

Take a 24-hour break

If you’re responsible for this headline on Yahoo! Style, step away from the keyboard and take a break — for about 24 hours. Then take a refresher course in the use of a hyphen:

24-hours sty

Hopefully to help

Huh? How do you helpfully build out a brand? What the heck did the writer for Yahoo! Style mean? Did she mean “to hopefully build” (meaning, to build with hope in one’s heart) or “to help build” (meaning, she can’t proofread)?

helpfully sty

At least she didn’t write runner-ups, but she did neglect to include the hyphen in what should be runners-up.

When I see expressions like “a piece” I have to wonder what the writer thinks that means. A piece of what? Did she perhaps mean each, in which case she should have used the word apiece.

Nice try, but wrong

The editors at yahoo.com made a valiant attempt to use the suspensive hyphen, but the result is really kinda pathetic:

fp mid-

The duchess is due in mid-April to late April. To avoid duplicating the word April, the writer tried using the suspensive hyphen after the prefix mid. Good job! But using a hyphen to join “to-late” makes no sense. But it’s too late to unsee that mistake. This should have been “mid- to late April.”

Take a 10-day break

If you’re responsible for this on yahoo.com, I suggest you take a 10-day break. Come back in 10 days and try to explain why you think this needs a hyphen:

fp 10-days

How is that a question?

How could that be a question?

fp how lost

If the brain trust at the Yahoo! front page had written “How is body heat lost?” — that would be a question.

It get’s an apostrophe

If it ends in an S, it gets an apostrophe. That seems to be the philosophy of punctuation over at Yahoo! Makers:

gets apost diy

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