Not a single reader supports this

Not a single writer or editor (except those working for Yahoo! Finance) supports the use of a plural verb (like support) with a singular noun (like, oh, say, maybe member):

No clue. No clue at all

I know this teaser on the home page of Yahoo! Finance is wrong, but I have no clue how to make it right:

Donald Trump lead makes no sense to me, even if the editor had used the correct past tense of lead, which is led. Is there a word or two missing? Should this be: Donald Trump’s election led …? Who knows!?

Also, who knows why the editor chose to use data as a plural noun. Although data can be used with either a singular or a plural verb, except in the most technical cases, it’s treated as a singular noun denoting a mass quantity. Anyone Googling the word would see that recent data shows it’s most often used with a singular verb.

It took my breath away

Reading this from Yahoo! Finance practically took my breath away:

Maybe someone could breathe some life back into this article with a different word choice.

Ford does it twice!

If you read this headline on Yahoo! Finance, would you be as confused as I am?

That headline from the homepage of Finance is for an article about Ford and General Motors. How much confidence would you have in the accuracy of the article?

I have a question

I have a question for the editors at Yahoo! Finance: Who the heck edited this? Anyone?

Am I supposed to mail my taxes to Yahoo!? Not a chance. If the intent was to tell readers to email a question, then them should be it.

Break down that word

The writer for  Yahoo! Finance needs to break down breakdown, which is a noun. (The verb is two words).

This is altogether wrong

This use of all together on Yahoo! Finance is altogether wrong:

The expression all together indicates a group performing some action collectively. The word that means “completely, entirely” is altogether.

A message to whoever wrote this

This is a message to whoever wrote this for Yahoo! Finance: You used the wrong pronoun.

Although it looks like you’re dealing with the object of the preposition to, you’re not. The entire clause starting with whomever lasts… is the object of the preposition. The writer should have used whoever, which is the subject of the verb lasts.

Here’s a good rule from grammarbook.com:

The presence of whoever or whomever indicates a dependent clause. Use whoever or whomever to agree with the verb in that dependent clause, regardless of the rest of the sentence.

That’s quite a claim

Sometimes separating a number from the words that explain it, isn’t such a bright idea. Take this excerpt from Yahoo! Finance:

less-than-claimed-fin

You might think, as I did, that $29,000 was 67% less than claimed earnings of $90,000. Then you might think, as I did, that $29,000 was the real median. And then you’d reread the sentence to reassure yourself that the real median was $61,000, or 33% less than claimed. Or maybe $61,000—67% of the amount claimed. But not, 67% less than claimed.

I’m starting to get a headache. I think I’ll go take 4 or 5 Advil and go lie down.

Where did the time go?

Doesn’t it seem that it was just yesterday that we were facing Dec. 23, 2016? But time flies, doesn’t it? At least it does at Yahoo! Finance, where it was 2017:

2017-fin

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