This is where I stopped reading

This is where I stopped reading a certain article on Yahoo! Sports:

where mlb

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To whoever is reading this

To whoever is reading this: The Yahoo! Sports writer is confused about the use of whomever (which is the objective case of whoever and is used as the object of a preposition) and whoever (which can be the subject of a verb like was listening):

to whomever spo

This writer isn’t alone in his confusion. To many people, it appears that whomever is the object of the preposition to, but it’s the entire clause that’s the object of the preposition. And whoever should be the subject of the verb in that clause.

If you’re not into being grammatically nitpicky and you’re faced with the choice between who and whom or whoever and whomever, go with who or whoever. In more the half the cases, you’ll be correct, and even if you’re wrong, your writing will sound more authentic and less stilted and formal.

We will emphasize with emphasis

We (meaning me and my keyboard) will emphasize that this Yahoo! Sports writer has confused a noun (like emphasis) with a verb (like emphasize):

we will emphasis mlb

Going from bad to worse

Misspelling dustup was bad. But things get worse on Yahoo! Sports when it comes to fisticuffs:

dust up mlb

Not a good craftsman

A good writing craftsman knows the difference between a plural and a singular noun, unlike this writer for Yahoo! Sports:

craftsmen mlb

Here’s the rundown

If there were more errors in this excerpt from Yahoo! Sports, I’d run down the worst of them, giving readers a rundown of mistakes:

rundown mlb 2

Alas, there’s only the misused rundown, which is a noun. The verbal phrase the writer should have used is run down.

Take a quick peek

Take a quick peek at this homophonic horror from Yahoo! Sports:

quick peak mlb

Did anyone hear her signing?

I just don’t understand the controversy that was recently covered by Yahoo! Sports. How many people could actually hear a woman signing the national anthem? I thought signing was a way to communicate with people who are hearing-challenged and therefore didn’t involve sounds:

signing mlb

Eek! An error!

Eek! Two errors compound this homophonic goof on Yahoo! Sports:

eek mlb

The expression is eke out, not eek out, not eke out of, and definitely not eek out of. The word eek is what cartoon characters (and apparently women in the 1970s) say when they see a mouse:

eek a mouse

Neither is singular

The writer and editor for Yahoo! Sports gave this sentence the thumbs-up. But neither was correct:

neither have been mlb

As a pronoun, neither is singular.

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